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Making neat cuts in lathe and plaster ?

Discussion in 'Building' started by happypeter, 28 Sep 2019.

  1. happypeter

    happypeter

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    Hi,

    I'm trying to cut into a lathe and plaster stud wall (to run some piping inside) then fix plasterboard over the top once done.

    Been using a multitool but the vibrations are makjng a hell of a mess (and loosening all the plaster in the lathe)? Is there a better way??

    thank you
     
  2. 23vc

    23vc

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    Sharper multi tool blade? Take plaster off laths first (several times round the perimeter with sharp Stanley) then try and get a clean cut on the laths? Use a holesaw drill attachment to make several holes? Don’t think there’s much else you can do as it’s always going to get disturbed a bit if it’s that fragile
     
  3. Tigercubrider

    Tigercubrider

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    Maybe an angle grinder with a slitting disc?
    It would probably make the heck of a mess
     
  4. happypeter

    happypeter

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    I've been using new blades on the multitool, I think its the way it vibrates that causes all the mess.

    Angle grinder may be better, I've been eyeing up one of those mini circular plunge saws! just reluctant to buy yet another tool <sigh> before knowing its going to work :)
     
  5. bernardgreen

    bernardgreen

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    Clamp the wall with pieces of wood either side of the wall next to where the cut will be made.

    Use screws or bolts through the wall to pull the pieces of wood togther while cutting.

    If the surfaces are very un-even then use padding between the wood and the surface

    The small holes for the screws can be filled in afterwards.

    Depending on the "quality" of the wall and the size of the hole it may be necessary to anchor the cut ends of the laths to a lath set at a right angle to the existing cut laths
     
  6. Tigercubrider

    Tigercubrider

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    A baton on the wall is always a good idea- or make a plate that has a slot in it.
    Do you have a jigsaw?

    A small plungesaw is £50.
     
  7. noseall

    noseall

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    Bosh it all out then fix it. No point faffing as the repairs will take the same amount of time, cost the same amount of money and will save you faffing about.
     
  8. happypeter

    happypeter

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    I think I understand. Seems a lot of work but may be the only option without buying more tools

    Have a jigsaw but need to make the cuts along the studs so as not to weaken the lathe and so I can replace with plasterboard once done.

    Leaning towards the plungesaw, I may then own every type of saw known to man!
     
  9. Tigercubrider

    Tigercubrider

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    They are handy
    I used to buy factory repaired tools from a black and decker outlet.
    They were checked, repaired if necessary, and sold cheaply with a full guarantee.

    But the guy in the shop told me that it was quite common for people to visit b&q on a Friday, buy a drill, put up shelves and return the drill saying it didn't work. Not that I would recommend such a thing.
     
  10. happypeter

    happypeter

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    That is all true but I'd then have to take the whole wall of lathe and plaster out. Its the clean up that scares me. Room is currently a bedroom trying to keep disruption to a minimum
     
  11. noseall

    noseall

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    Using a multitool in a bedroom is hardly dust free.o_O
     
  12. happypeter

    happypeter

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    I make full use of return policies but usually only when tools fail to live up to the advertising, can't bring myself to return truely handy tools ;)
     
  13. happypeter

    happypeter

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    No its horrible. I was hoping there was some tried and tested method/tool for the job. The vacuum attachements on the plunge saws look hopeful but maybe I should bite the bullet and go at it with the lump hammer :confused:
     
  14. Tigercubrider

    Tigercubrider

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    Spending a bit of time with some plastic sheeting and timber to make a sort of tented area helps
    Make it big enough to cope with it collapsing as the vacuuming starts
    All it does is help with the dust but better than nothing
     
  15. Nige F

    Nige F

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    An £8 tenon saw from screwfix - or 2 when 1 gets blunt(y)
     
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