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Matching bricks

Discussion in 'Building' started by ash1212002, 22 Sep 2019.

  1. ash1212002

    ash1212002

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    Need to purchase bricks to match existing brickwork, however there are two variants to my knowledge that I've found from looking online

    Unsure which ones are on my property

    The two I've found are Tradesman Tudor and LBC Tudor.

    There is a significant difference in price between the two, why is this?

    The house was built in the 70's

    Can anyone tell me which are the right bricks I require?

    [​IMG]
     
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  3. Charlie George

    Charlie George

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    The Tradesman Tudor(Ibstock) are a cheaper copy of LBC tudor (original) they also have perforations rather than frogs,they are still quite a good match and will save you a few quid. Yours will be original LBC.
     
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  4. ^woody^

    ^woody^

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    Bear in mind that for extensions, the planning requirement of bricks "to match" does not mean "the same as". Even if you do get the same type they will tend to look different regardless.
     
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  5. ash1212002

    ash1212002

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    I've been told the tradesman tudor are a better/stronger brick and frost resistant than the lbc tudor originals

    Which ones do you think I should go for?

    Given that there is no guarantee either will blend in well!
     
  6. ^woody^

    ^woody^

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    What I've found with a lot of the imitation LBC bricks is that that whilst that have some features of the originals, they are perceptibly different - tend to be darker and the texture is different. Also they tend to stain a lot easier - especially if the bricklayer is not that good with the trowel.

    The main advantages tend to be for the bricklayer in that the bricks have holes and not a square frog, and are squarer with more defined edges. The upshot is that they are easier to lay.

    I would not worry about frost resistance, that wont be an issue at all so don't use that in any comparision.

    I suppose it will be down to price and appearance. If you can't get to see any actual completed walls with the imitation bricks, then if cost is an issue it's whether you want to take a chance and if any difference will be an for you - you may want a closer match on the front of a house say, but on the back you may not really see any difference.
     
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  7. Mobo_14

    Mobo_14

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    Just slightly off topic woody but why would you prefer holes to a frog? Just because the original LBC have a right deep one??
     
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  9. ^woody^

    ^woody^

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    Perforated bricks are much easier to lay.

    London bricks need either a massive bed when laying frog down :whistle: and even then sometimes the bricks dont go down properly so you lift them up and add a bit more mortar. Also you can't slide the brick and so need to tap it down.
    Frog up :sick: means double bed laying, and difficult to get the brick down and tap it in the frog or on the edges.

    Perforated bricks just slide down nicely, you can lay a long bed quickly and no tapping required.
     
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  10. ash1212002

    ash1212002

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    I've placed an order for the LBC Tudors. I would have regretted it if I went for the Tradesman and they didn't look as good as the originals
     
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  11. DIYhard

    DIYhard

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    I recently used some perforated bricks (ten holes) and found them really awkward to lay. Even with quite a stiff mix, lots of mortar fell down the holes and the slight movement due to laying a second brick would cause the first brick to sink down as mortar was displaced upwards into the holes.

    A quick web search revealed no advice specific to perforated bricks, so I just carried on as best I could, making the mortar stiffer and stiffer, as I needed to get finished and this was non-critical work - just two courses of Class B engineering bricks to go under a timber shed.

    Obviously my technique was at fault, please Woody can you suggest what I was doing wrong? In the past I have used Flettons and solid concrete blocks without difficulty (amateur jobs such as garden walls), but these perforated bricks seemed like the invention of the devil, and I kept wishing I had paid the extra and bought solids.
     
  12. ^woody^

    ^woody^

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    Without seeing how you were laying the bed and then forming the trough, its hard to say.

    But generally you should lay the bed, then angle the sides (45-60° or so), and that gives a solid mass. Then when you form the trough this compacts the mortar, partly fills perforations, and spreads it evenly ready to place the brick on it. Then you cut the excess off.

    Done right, this will be enough mortar to allow you to press the brick down without tapping, the perforations fill up, and the bed is solid, and just enough mortar squeezes out which you cut off and use for vertical joint of the next brick.

    Done wrong, the bricks sink or may be uneven, you may need to add mortar to the bed, or its too much and it all flops out and you are banging the bricks down.

    It does take practice and with experience you get the right amount. The idea is is that you do all this with the least amount of motion and number of moves - no repetitive bending and picking up mortar or returning excess to the spot board.

    This is why the perforations help as they fill when you press the brick down. With solid beds, you need to be even more careful as the mortar will have to come out of the sides instead, and it its too much its hard to get the brick own or worse the excess slides down the face of the wall or in the cavity.
     
  13. noseall

    noseall

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    A lot of poorly matched masonry is down to incredible apathy and ignorance towards matching the mortar. Many brickies have their preferred sand regardless of colour. We will use different blends of sand to achieve the right colour and strive to get the colour and the method of pointing bang on.
     
  14. DIYhard

    DIYhard

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    Apologies for diverting this thread into a discussion about perforated bricks.
    Woody, many thanks, what you describe is very like the way we were shown at school 60 years ago (between Bedford and Peterborough, so almost everything was built from Flettons). I still have about a dozen of the perforated Wienerberger Class B left over, and will play with them sometime to see whether I can improve my technique.
     
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