Modern toilet questions

Discussion in 'Plumbing and Central Heating' started by gwebstech, 30 Mar 2020.

  1. gwebstech

    gwebstech

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    Hi guys

    Im thinking of installing a new toilet, one that goes 'back to the wall'

    But im not sure how you add the water inlet when its all hidden and also i imagine you have to have the soil pipe fixed into the wall so that when you slide the toilet back into place, you have to hope you get a good fit on the rubber connecting to the toilet?

    How do you go about these things?

    thanks
     
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  3. Mottie

    Mottie

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    I have a conventional back to the wall toilet with no space to even see the water inlet and soil pipe. I use a flexible braided fill pipe and a flexible connector between the toilet and soil stack. With the whole assembly about a foot away from the wall, I fully extend the flexible soil pipe connector, fit it to the toilet and soil stack and then slide the whole toilet into place and the connector just collapses. Bit of a fiddle but I don’t know of any other way.
    23833F2C-1B67-4074-A23F-26E7030A1DF4.jpeg

    5D4DE2A5-DB82-4C1D-B4F8-28A3CCC30C97.jpeg
     
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  4. Elkato531

    Elkato531

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    Do you really want/need a toilet with no way to visually inspect for leaks when installed or in the future. You can be sure that these things were not designed by anyone who has had to install or repair one. I certainly wouldn't want a flexi carrying mains pressure water that I couldn't inspect or easily isolate.
     
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  5. Mottie

    Mottie

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    Yes, that’s the style I want.

    Really? You know this for a fact?

    It’s okay, I have one of those magic taps in my house that cuts off all the water if I notice a leak. I don’t think much further damage could be prevented by having another easily reachable isolated in case of emergency - by the time the leak is discovered, I could switch the main supply off a damn sight quicker that getting a screwdriver to turn off an isolation valve.

    Each to their own. Are all the pipes that carry water under mains pressure easily visible in your house then? All of them?
     
    Last edited: 31 Mar 2020
  6. Elkato531

    Elkato531

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    All the flexis yes. I've attended many flooded properties where a flexi has burst usually caused by corrosion of the stainless steel braid which would have been obvious with a quick visual inspection. It doesn't matter how quickly you can turn the water off if you're out when it blows. The isolation valve is for maintenance.

    As for the design, its a classic case of form over function. But as you say, each to their own. My advice was to the OP asking them to question whether they really want this kind of toilet with a set of installation and maintenance problems not present with other designs.
     
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  7. Mottie

    Mottie

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    That’s my point. Your house will be just as flooded as mine in that situation.
     
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  8. Elkato531

    Elkato531

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    Except that I will have noticed that corroded flexi last week and done something about it. Also if my pan connector developed a leak, which they are prone to do eventually, I'll spot that before I've got ****ty water leaking through the ceiling below.
     
  9. Mottie

    Mottie

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    Are you saying you check them weekly? I’m surprised you have them. If they are as bad as you say they are and you can get to them why don’t you have a fixed pipe? As you can see, our toilet is on a fully tiled floor so I think I’d see or smell something if we had any sort of a leak. I’m prepared to take the gamble for a cleaner look. If it leaks, it leaks and I’ll just have to deal with that when and if it happens.
     
    Last edited: 31 Mar 2020
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  11. Elkato531

    Elkato531

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    Mixer taps on flexis as that's how they're supplied, and I have a good idea of their condition. Everything else on solid pipe. I'm only pointing out the potential drawbacks of having everything totally concealed and installed on flexible fittings just as I would if a customer asked for advice. Your obviously very happy with the way your toilet is installed. I'd prefer not to do it that way and would only install for a customer if they insisted on going ahead with knowledge of the potential drawbacks.
     
  12. Elkato531

    Elkato531

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    My initial post was advice for the OP not for you.
     
  13. Mottie

    Mottie

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    Ah, I see. Customary to start those posts with 'OP' to avoid confusion. (y)
     
  14. gwebstech

    gwebstech

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    thanks guys, i can see how they put some people off- it requires some consideration i think
     
  15. chris911sc

    chris911sc

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    I am fitting a modern back to wall toilet similar to the one on Mottie's post above.

    It is located in upstairs bathroom. Wooden floor has been removed as well as old plasterboard, so routing pipe whatever way is best is not a problem.

    What is the best practice to connect water supply? from back or through hole on the side (see attached photo i took of the web for illustration )?
    Thanks
     

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  16. gwebstech

    gwebstech

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    if you can fit it to the side like your image shows id do that personally, i fitted these toilets in my house and i assumed they had the side fitting like that but when they came they didnt! What they did have instead was a slight angle on the bottom where it meets the wall which is barely enough to connect a flexi pipe, and in fact actaully keep the toilet away from the wall a fraction. id already routed the pipe as if id known i woud have had to route the inlet behind where the toilet actually is
     
  17. lostinthelight

    lostinthelight

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    Op, what type of toilet are you refering to. I Could be wrong but Ive always understood a back to wall toilet as being one where only the pan is visible as most if not all close coupled toilets have the cistern back to the wall .Motties looks to me as being close coupled with flush to wall pan?
     
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