Moving communal aerial / satellite socket

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Hey

I have a communal socket in my living room - since getting blinds over curtains it sticks out like a sore thumb! Next year I plan to redecorate and want to hide as many of these cables as I can.

It provides both freeview and satellite signal (although I have my own sky dish as the communal system was so useless.)

Obviously aside from making sure I’m allowed too with the freeholder of the property - is moving this a straight forward enough task? I won’t ever use the satellite part, the cable plugged in is the aerial for 2 rooms. Ideally what I’d like is it moved all the way down to the bottom and hidden down in the pipe boxing completely out of view.

Good news is the cable runs up from the bottom so it would in theory be a case of disconnecting / drilling new lower down hole where the pipe boxing is and reconnecting.

I guess the second option (to keep all the changes limited to only inside the flat) would be to make a join and extend the wires and fish them down the wall - but I guess a connection is always a weak point.

The only thing I’m not sure about is how to disconnect / reconnect the module in this box which would be needed - it’s not something I’ve seen before - anyone familiar with these?

Cheers
Marc

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The module should have a removable cover (the "circle with slice cut off" part), and once this is off it should be obvious how the cables are fitted to it.
In principle, it should be just a matter of disconnecting the cables (making sure to note which is which), and reterminate as required.
Is the wall hollow below, or are the cables buried in the plaster ? You should be able to fit a flush box and cut down the depth of the socket to just the faceplate.
Also, you can get right-angle adapters for F connectors, and right-angle plugs/sockets for the TV/radio connectors - that will allow you to take the signal away without the cable loop sticking out.
 
The module should have a removable cover (the "circle with slice cut off" part), and once this is off it should be obvious how the cables are fitted to it.
In principle, it should be just a matter of disconnecting the cables (making sure to note which is which), and reterminate as required.
Is the wall hollow below, or are the cables buried in the plaster ? You should be able to fit a flush box and cut down the depth of the socket to just the faceplate.
Also, you can get right-angle adapters for F connectors, and right-angle plugs/sockets for the TV/radio connectors - that will allow you to take the signal away without the cable loop sticking out.
Thanks for that will take apart and take another look - the wall is dot and dab - the cable to the box runs upwards outside so I could just drill a hole further down and get it into that boxing by the sounds of it - thank you!
 
Rather than put it into the boxing, I'd suggest chasing in a plaster box and bringing the cables into the back of that. Mount it a little higher up the wall, it'll stick out a lot less than the pipework boxing and be less prone to damage. You'll have a but of damaged wall around the box for a while, but as long as you fill it smooth and flush with the plaster, it'll disappear when you decorate.
Use a 45mm plaster box - it takes more effort to chase out the hole, but it gives plenty of room to coil a bit of spare cable into. I hate trying to get too much cable into too shallow a box, plus with coax (and some other) cables, it's really bad for them.
 
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If this is a communal aerial/sat system be aware that anything that you do and if you get it wrong you could affect the other residents reception
 
Is it just me or does it look like the brown cables have an oxidised metal crimp connection showing as they go into that plastered wall? Or is it something else?

That tri/quadplex plate: looks a lot like a Triax one to me, or a clone of one, with the Return moulded label feeding to another room typically when used in flats.
https://www.satcure.co.uk/tech/wall_plates.htm has some helpful info/pictures of such wallplates.
Note the warning about sharp bends and or crushing the cables... that can do a lot or harm to the wanted signals.

Communal system: Their property... They should move (at a fairly considerable cost no doubt).
Own dish: Likely needed Planning Permission (only N antennas per building are allowed) and Freeholder permission to affix to the structure.
 
If this is a communal aerial/sat system be aware that anything that you do and if you get it wrong you could affect the other residents reception
This has crossed my mind and obviously I don’t want to cause issues for anyone else - have decided anything I do with it will be done by a proper aerial fitter - not only that but being the 2nd floor would rather someone more comfortable working at heights drilling the new hole!
Is it just me or does it look like the brown cables have an oxidised metal crimp connection showing as they go into that plastered wall? Or is it something else?

That tri/quadplex plate: looks a lot like a Triax one to me, or a clone of one, with the Return moulded label feeding to another room typically when used in flats.
https://www.satcure.co.uk/tech/wall_plates.htm has some helpful info/pictures of such wallplates.
Note the warning about sharp bends and or crushing the cables... that can do a lot or harm to the wanted signals.

Communal system: Their property... They should move (at a fairly considerable cost no doubt).
Own dish: Likely needed Planning Permission (only N antennas per building are allowed) and Freeholder permission to affix to the structure.

That does look like it thank you will read up on that - see what you mean from the pictures but it’s just slightly damaged sleving on the cable it’s self as it goes into the wall to the outside.

I will look into to seeing what the freeholder would charge - although my experience with them is far from great!

As for our own dish it does seem abit of a weird one round here - probably 50% of the leaseholder flats have their own dish installed, probably because the communal system was so unreliable!
 

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