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New kitchen, paint first?

Discussion in 'Decorating and Painting' started by robodelfy, 1 May 2020.

  1. robodelfy

    robodelfy

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    I've just ripped out my old kitchen and the new one has arrived flat packed. Sorry for any silly questions, I'm new to this!

    I'm guessing it's standard practice to paint the walls first and touch up after?

    What about the area I want tiled, I just leave the plaster as is there?

    And finally, on the photo can you see the black areas low on the walls, in the corner etc. Any idea what this could be? Is it mold, if so, what's the best thing to do before I fit the kitchen?

    Thanks very much
    20200501_133759.jpg
     
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  3. dvdskilton

    dvdskilton

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    ok im a fitter by trade i always get the walls to the stage where they ready for there last coat as for the tile area don't paint this get it as flat as you can now then before tiles pva mix then tile and finally your top coat on the painting ps the ceiling can be fully finished before you start i would also treat that damp (bleach) the mould make sure you have a gap between the floor and plaster
     
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  4. jonbey

    jonbey

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    Cillit Bang black mould remover is good.

    Are those solid walls? If so, I'd think about insulating the walls behind the units. Might be tricky, losing some unit space, but will help prevent more mould forming. It will come back if there is no insulation in the walls, and it will cause problems. Might even be worth bleaching, hacking the plaster off, bleaching again, then insulating and boarding over, just to worktop height. Will help keep the room warmer too. But if not a solid wall, ignore me and just bleach it.
     
  5. dvdskilton

    dvdskilton

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    mold wont die with anything like bleach ect it just takes the edge off it it in beds in the plaster there are so many reasons why we get mould if both walls in the picture are external then yes it may well be insulation thats caused it it could also be you need ventilation
     
  6. robodelfy

    robodelfy

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    Thanks I have HG mould remover which tends to work quite well. As you say I'm worried about it coming back.

    I just had a builder round for other reasons. He said it could well just be a tiny leak from the pipes, as it's only in the corner below the pipes. The other black area is directly behind the washing machine. This kitchen hasn't been changed for 25 years or more.

    They are solid walls, it's a Victorian mid terrace house.

    Insulating behind is not really possible, it's an IKEA kitchen, there's no space at the back, and I have the worktops so can't really bring it out further
     
  7. JohnD

    JohnD

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    the mountain-shaped dark patch in the corner is damp. I see some pipes there. Most likely you have, or had, a leak. It is essential to repair this and let the damp patch dry out before painting or tiling. If you have a concrete floor, the leak may be from a pipe in the floor. If a wooden floor, lift some boards and look underneath.

    The black mark to the left of the window looks to me like it might be dirt. Try scrubbing it. A fridge or oven can cause this due to the warmed air currents. Oven dirt is often greasy.

    Don't put PVA glue on anything you hope one day to paint.
     
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  8. jonbey

    jonbey

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    Well, I'd def. look at adding some insulation, even if only 20mm kingspan glued on the wall. It's a kitchen and those walls will be cold, so just as likely condensation as leaky pipes.
     
  9. dvdskilton

    dvdskilton

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    lag the pipes just to rule out condensation on the pipes its cheap enough
    dont forget get the ceiling done 1st then the walls to the last coat stage then pva your tiled area fit the kitchen leave kickboards off tile above worktops fit your flooring next then kickboards now fit your skirting boards prep and undercoat them top coat your walls and top coat you skirtings sit back with a brew
    i did notice you have very little sockets are you getting that done 1st???
     
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  11. JohnD

    JohnD

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    if you paint the walls before fitting the cabinets, some may say you have wasted paint, but it will be much quicker and easier, and you won't have unsighty bare patches if you ever move anything.
     
  12. robodelfy

    robodelfy

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    Thanks very much

    So if it's old plaster that was never painted, should I still water down some emulsion for the first coat? Or can you paint straight on old plaster?
     
  13. JohnD

    JohnD

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    bare, unpainted plaster needs mist coat(s), however old it is. Or it will suck the moisture out of your brush or roller, and the paint will lie on the surface instead of soaking in. You can use white matt emulsion, which is cheaper than colours, and use your chosen colour for a couple of finish coats later.

    If you have coloured paint aplenty, that will be fine, but if you have to buy it, white will save you money. Don't use a strong or contrasting colour.

    If it has previously been wallpapered, clean the old paste off. I do it with a warm-water sprayer and a broad metal scraper, but some people scrub it. You have to wipe, rub or scrape the loosened paste away, or it will set again. The same with PVA glue if it has been left on the surface, or dirt, especially greasy kitchen deposits. Use sugar soap for that.

    A coat of paint will also make the room look better and brighter, and more like a home than a building site.

    p.s.
    I agree with @dvdskilton about getting your electrics (and any drilling or patching) done before you start to decorate.
     
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  14. dvdskilton

    dvdskilton

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    i cant stress enogh how important it is to get the old paste off the walls before painting some pastes even turned the paint yellowish and crazed well spotted JOHND
     
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  15. sparkwright

    sparkwright

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    Painting the walls where the cupboards go is a better job, it also gives a light coloured surface so the kitchen fitter can clearly see where his pencil marks are!
     
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  16. robodelfy

    robodelfy

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    Thanks, great advice. I'm pretty certain it hasn't been wallpapered. I have some cheap white emulsion, so I can use this for a mist coat. Do you actually have to spray it on somehow, or can you just water down the emulsion and brush it on?

    Also, I have those black areas as mentioned before, which appear to be mould, possibly from the washing machine and from the pipes in the corner. Any ideas what to do about this. I have some paint that is meant to seal mouldy patches so they dont she through, but maybe its not a good idea to seal it in. Its an old victorian house

    thanks agin for all the help
     
  17. JohnD

    JohnD

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    big brush or roller, thinned with water. Like milk. the first coat should practically disappear as it soaks in. I like to apply a second coat but some disagree.

    I'd scrub the black patches with sugar soap and rub off with an old towel until the wall looks clean.
     
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