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New tool time but what to go for?

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Hudson1984, 26 Sep 2019.

  1. Hudson1984

    Hudson1984

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    Hi all,

    ok so yesterday I turned a year older and as is the case most years, this meant an influx of screwfix vouchers :D

    So, atm i'm building my little workshop with the aim of being able to make more things - I've no real end aim but we've some large (ish) projects on the horizon and i'd like to be set up so thought i'd ask some advice on which way to go with tooling.

    the projects we have are mainly garden based, so planters, fencing, possibly a garden bench - LOTS of sleepers for raised beds.

    Now I have a drill (don't have an impact driver) I have a circular saw and the normal list of hand tools. I have also got a mitre saw setup in a fence.

    I was thinking of a jigsaw but to be honest I wonder how much i'd actually use it and perhaps a bench bandsaw would be better long term.

    So anyway, at the moment I'm a bit torn as to what to go for.
    A drill press?
    A bench top sander?
    Various things as in, Lin Bins, more clamps etc etc.
    Router - never used one before but look pretty bloody handy.
    Impact driver?

    any hints on key tooling would be great as the options are getting the better of me haha.
     
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  3. Nozzle

    Nozzle

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    A drill press is dead handy - only if set up properly!!! (A mirrot really helps doing this)
    Perhaps an air compressor, depends what jobs you get in to.
    Routers are fun, but splash out on a Trend unit (which has proper speed control). AND PPE!!!!
    You can buy cheap router tables for the above, with a handy little lab jack.
    Quick clamps are very good
    Best think I bought was a Miluakee drill driver that came with an 90 degree elbow and an offset nd normal chuck. Really useful.
    If you have big cash knocking around, a planer-thicknesser
    Nozzle
     
  4. wgt52

    wgt52

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    Drill press would be my choice.

    If you 'fancy' a Router I'd go talk with a proper tool shop first. Understand what it can do, how it does it, what accessories you need to go with it. I'd also consider a router table, one which suits the machine.
    If it's your first one don't buy the most powerful and therefore heaviest one initially. You do need to practise using the tool.
     
  5. Hudson1984

    Hudson1984

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    yeah i'm swaying toward the drill press. I made a bit of a boo boo with my mitre saw in that the bench was a little narrow and as such it sits further forward than I planned otherwise I wouldn't be able to turn to cut anything near 45 degress. This being said, with it further forward I now have a larger amount of space on the bench behind the fence, so was thinking of mounting the drill on there.

    So looking like i'll go drill and a bench vice (don't have one - DEFINITELY NEED ONE!)

    the router table is certainly a goal, I want to make doors in the garage so being able to shape would be great.
     
  6. festive

    festive

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    OK interesting, loving my tools but yes right tools for the job and or my must have tools in my arsenal.

    For gardening work fencing sleepers etc.

    Impact driver - (Makita for me as all my tools are cordless makita) - make sure you have a good set of impact bits to go with it or youll chew through standard bits
    Mitre saw, i have a sliding and fixed depending, the sliding of course handles better larger sleepers.
    A decent large engineer square
    Hardwood or plastic bevel gauge
    Pair of trestles for working on and or creating a workbench for your mitre saw.
    Clamps (i prefer to use F Clamps hold better and normally cheaper than quick clamps)
    Wood drills? - ERBAUER EXTRA LONG FLAT WOOD DRILL BIT SET
    A DECENT plug and cutter set to counter sink on hardwood and or wood plug the holes
    Post hole digger?
    Petrol powered auger drill?
    Decent narrow gauge spade much better for fine work in garden.

    General must have tools in my arsenal

    Pillar drill
    Compressor (i have a silent dentist style compressor it's fab)
    Impact driver (as above)
    Bench grinder with chisel stone - sharpening drills chisels tools etc.

    I do have a router but it's only 1/4 inch shank so not so good for kitchen worktops etc, but i use it mainly for door hinges and fine work on interior trim etc. A great tool but you need to know what you're doing with it, i just about do.

    I have alot of tools though depending what i apply to i adjust my tool bag.
     
    Last edited: 26 Sep 2019
  7. noseall

    noseall

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    Two of the most used tools in our kit are the multi tool (brilliant) and the impact drives (how did we manage without them!).
     
  8. festive

    festive

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    Agree multi tool is good, but find myself only using it to plunge cut into architrave and skirting where it is perfick, anything else i use mini grinder for stone or metal. What else do you use it for?
     
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  10. noseall

    noseall

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    Jeepers - everything. We are doing a big complicated job presently and are just fitting the Cedral cladding. Used it today to trim off the bottom bit of plastic fascia to allow the top plank of Cedral to sit flush. We absolutely batter it when roofing, when doing roof line (priceless), drainage, skirts, arch's.....every single day.
     
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  11. noseall

    noseall

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    Essential as is the 9" when doing Cedral. We fit a 12" diamond blade in my big DeWalt slider for the Cedral cross cuts.
     
  12. mattylad

    mattylad

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    Ignore all the above recommendations.

    Get a "roundtuit".
    We are always wanting to get one of those, so having one in your toolbox will enable you to do so many jobs.
     
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  13. Harry Bloomfield

    Harry Bloomfield

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    Yes, but you have to be lucky to have the right size of roundtuit in your toolbox. So many different sized ones, metric and imperial.
     
  14. Hudson1984

    Hudson1984

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    went for the multitool - looks a good bit of kit and already been put to work on a door frame - much easier than my crap chiselling skills
     
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  15. noseall

    noseall

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  16. noseall

    noseall

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    Top tip: Whilst the wood cutting multitool blades are ok, they dull very quickly when you inevitably strike something harder than wood. Always buy the multi-purpose ones.(y)
     
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