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No pipe to solvent weld. Internal coupler?

Discussion in 'Plumbing and Central Heating' started by Dazza Jones, 3 Aug 2020.

  1. Dazza Jones

    Dazza Jones

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    I am replacing my bath however the new one sits lower so I need to reroute some pipework.
    I was hoping to just cut the fitting off and reweld some new on however there doesn't look like I will have enough pipe left.
    Is there such thing as an internal coupler?
    There would be 20mm left coming out the floor if I cut that 1st coupler off but trying to avoid messing with the floor.

    Anyone have any ideas how to can sort it? I maybe can't see the wood for the trees.
    Picture attached.
     

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  3. denso13

    denso13

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    No, not really.

    Not great but would probably be enough for solvent weld. Looks like if you could just have a bit bigger gap around the pipe into the floor you would have plenty though.
     
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  4. just pumps

    just pumps

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    You mind the pipe doesn`t disappear under the floor when you cut it though! :ROFLMAO:
     
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  5. just pumps

    just pumps

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    Realise that you were most likely in a rush but what does "not really" mean? o_O
     
  6. denso13

    denso13

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    I thought if I had just said no then someone would have said "of course there is". I can think of something but it isn't really suitable.
     
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  7. Dazza Jones

    Dazza Jones

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    Thanks. Looks like I'm getting the multitool out and digging some floor away!
     
  8. just pumps

    just pumps

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    There is nothing that I would be happy signing off on but always open to ideas, what yer got?
     
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  10. johnny2007

    johnny2007

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    Best option, however, use a little bit of wire to check where the pipe goes so you can start chipping way on the opposite side, avoiding any disaster.
    After opening a little more, you'll be able to put some metal sheet to protect the pipe if it is superficial.
     
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  11. AdrianUK

    AdrianUK

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    Any kind of internal coupler would reduce the internal diameter of the pipe & provide a 'ledge' on which crud and other debris are going to collect ready to start a blockage.....
     
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  12. dilalio

    dilalio

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    Use the multitool to cut vertical strips through the existing coupling, but not the pipe inside. Do about 4 or 5 and then, if you're lucky, you can prise the strips off with a sharp chisel or screwdriver. Get between the two surfaces, where the solvent line is and go gently. Once you've got the strips off, you can then peel away the rest of the fitting all the way round... Cut the coupling in half first and wedge something down the hole to hold the pipe steady and prevent it from dropping down.

    It doesn't always work but worth a try. I did same the other day on a waste coming through a wall, straight into an elbow... Outside was underground!
     
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  13. Tigercubrider

    Tigercubrider

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    For a system that used plastic drain pipes as rails for a camera dolly, I cut a short length of pipe and then removed a few mm by cutting parallel cuts along it's length a few mm apart. This was just enough to allow the short tube to be slid into a pipe, and joined to another.

    In theory if you got your measurements right, and chamfered the upstream edge, it might work for liquids

    I also managed to crack a washing machine drain that was blocked. The builder hadn't used a "proper" drain but had constructed a U bend out of solvent weld pipe that was buiried in the screed.

    I managed to dig it out and find the hole, cut a piece of pipe to be a half slice, and glued it over the hole.
    I used a ton of cable ties to pull the patch tight to the original until the glue set

    You could try a mix of both but it may leak
     
  14. polesapart

    polesapart

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    Before doing anything remove trap and get a sense of how much play (upwards) there is in the pipe and how inclined it is to dissappear downwards
    (as @ just pumps says above)
     
  15. opps

    opps

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    Looking at the image the pipe coming out of the floor seems to run into a straight connector and then the pipe above that runs directly into an elbow.

    If the OP were to cut the pipe just below the elbow, and then carefully cut grooves in the coupling (along its length), wouldn't he be able to use a screwdriver/etc to pry/snap the straight connector apart. I assume (possibly incorrectly) that he would be able to remove any traces of glue with acetone.
     
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