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OSB on Interior Walls

Discussion in 'Building' started by Mark-UK, 14 Nov 2019.

  1. Mark-UK

    Mark-UK

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    Does anyone know a good site that explains how to fix OSB over Kingspan over breeze block interior walls?

    This is the set up I'm considering:

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    But I'm not sure about dimensions for studs, gaps between studs, stud thickness, that kind of thing.

    Thank you.
     
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  3. catlad

    catlad

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    I would cut the kingspan in half making them 8'x 2' and stud accordingly laying the osb. on its side. If you think the wall might get wet then lay some 10mm pvc. under the sole plate. Old pvc fascia is good for that.
     
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  4. Mark-UK

    Mark-UK

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    Thanks Catlad.

    Any idea how long the screws need to be to fasten the studwork to the breeze blocks? I'll be looking to hang shelves, tool cabinets and other things but I don't want to use the OSB for that; I'll be fastening them to the studwork itself. If that's the correct way to go about it. Just worried the OSB won't take the load.
     
  5. John D v2.0

    John D v2.0

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    it will be plenty strong enough even if you screw into the osb, but it makes sense to hit a stud if you know where they are. Most of the loads for cladding and normal shelving are downwards with only the uppermost fixings trying to pull out.
    I'm not a builder but if it's breeze blocks i.e. those celcon ones that are like crispy cakes then I'd probably use long e.g. 120mm+ frame fixers for the studs, every few hundred millimetres. They don't expand too much and it what I used for the kitchen cabinets which were mounted on bits of plywood. But they don't have a huge pull out force.
    If you are planning to store all your weight lifting kit on the shelves you might need resin set threaded rods into the blocks, but to be honest you'd be having a floor support as well and just using the wall for stability.
     
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  6. Mark-UK

    Mark-UK

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  7. ^woody^

    ^woody^

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  9. Mark-UK

    Mark-UK

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    Thanks Woody
     
  10. John D v2.0

    John D v2.0

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  11. Mark-UK

    Mark-UK

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    I've been doing a bit of research and apparently it's safer to use nails for timber framing due to their tensile strength. If I remember correctly I think they were talking about exterior timber construction.

    If I want to put up a timber frame for interior insulation, and hang a few shelves/cabinets off the frame, should I use screws or should I go with nails?

    EDIT: I'm specifically talking about fixing timber to timber; I'll be using hammer fixings for timber to concrete.
     
    Last edited: 19 Nov 2019
  12. ^woody^

    ^woody^

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    The strength comparison is really irelevant. It all comes down to the normal things such as ease, cost, time, appearance etc, and whether you may need to dismantle these at some future time.
     
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  13. Mark-UK

    Mark-UK

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    May as well stick to some screws then.

    Thank you Woody.
     
  14. DIYnot Local

    DIYnot Local

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