Plasterboard finish to wood

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Hi All,

I'm dry-lining a wall & one end of it butts up to the back of a wooden (MDF) built-in bookcase (see pic). How can I finish the corner without it cracking after a while? I'd rather not use some kind of stick-on trim. On a normal internal corner I'd use tape but I can't here because I won't be covering the wood with filler. I'm going to have exactly the same issue when I finish around a window, which i guess is a more common problem.
2019-10-12 22.42.23.jpg

Thanks,
Adam
 
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Thanks for the reply. I'm not sure I see how stop bead will help though. Are you suggesting I put it over the end of the board and then push that up to the wood? Is that any better than what I've got in the picture? There would still be a gap, which would be likely to crack in due course.

I forgot to say that I'm taping & filling the joints, then sealing. Not skimming.

Thanks,
Adam.
 
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Can you draw a cross section of what you’re trying to do, can’t quite make it out from the photo
 
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If I were faced with your scenario. I would apply a coat of paint/primer to both the plasterboard and the MDF. I would then run a fine bead of CT1 (or Sixaflex, or any other MS polymer). The MS polymer will not shrink bask (unlike standard caulk) and will be both flexible and paintable (unlike silicone).

Apply a coat of paint first to reduce the level of suction and if need be, use a silicone profiling tool (eg Fugi) with itdecorators wipes for cleaning up (the stuff is really, really sticky).

After applying any MS polymer, always coat it with a waterbased primer/undercoat. If you don't and apply oil based paint over it, the oil based paint will remain tacky for months. BTW that is not an exaggeration, by way of an example, earlier this year I painted a room for a customer, I forgot that two years earlier I had used some CT1 to fill gaps under the skirting boards , they meet the oak flooring. 6 weeks after I painted over the CT1 with oil based UC and then eggshelled it, the paint was still wet.
 
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If it was being skimmed a stop bead would have worked, as the skim stops at the bead and there’s no join to crack. Missed the fact that you were taping instead. So yeah, caulk.
 
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