Plastering kitchen from brick.

M

marsaday

I have just remodelled a kitchen and it is now ready to plaster.

I have a new boarded ceiling, but all the walls are brick. There are a few areas of plasterwork still on the walls above the windows, but generally it is all brick.

I want to plaster the brick, but not use boards so i was hoping to get some advise on here.

1) What levelling tool do i need. I have seen tool station sell a plasterers derby and a feather edge. Do i need both and what is each tool actually for?

2) I was thinking of using batons screwed to the wall to act as my guide and i then plaster around them. I would then take them off and fill in the bits. Is this the correct way to go ?

3) To take the skim coat do i need to scratch the base coat and will a nail work ok ?

4) Do i need to wet the bricks first ?

5) Is it better to use browning or bonding plaster ?

Thanks for any help. All tips appreciated
 
Sponsored Links
S

sammoseley

1. feather edge
2. could do but not necessary if you level it with featheredge, can use bays of plaster and rule level with them
3. devil float it which is poly or wood float with screw thru it
4. yes soak them
5. hardwall or tough coat if high suction ie house bricks, bonding if low suction or if you PVA it first

dot n dab generally quicker and less hassle for most

cheers
Sam
 
M

marsaday

Thanks for info, but i want to do a hard wall due to taking the wall units, plus dont mind learning the skills.

I did a bit more reading and people seemed to thin you need to do a sand/cement undercoat first on bare brick ?

Will this be the case do you think ?

Here is a pic of the walls to do (inc block).

View media item 66278
 
Sponsored Links
Joined
19 Dec 2009
Messages
2,729
Reaction score
418
Location
Hampshire
Country
United Kingdom
if your going to float and set you may want to chase the electrics into the wall as it looks like you will have to float really thick to clear the wires
chasing them back into the wall will half the amount of base coat
 
M

marsaday

Thanks Steve. Something to think about I suppose. What do you guys do the base coat at ? I was thinking about doing 19mm as was going to use a 19mm lat to act as my guide.
 
Joined
19 Dec 2009
Messages
2,729
Reaction score
418
Location
Hampshire
Country
United Kingdom
its supposed to be around 11mm with the skim coat at 2-3mm leaving the wires running along the surface will more or less double your thickness of base coat making it 2x as expensive also take your 19mm guide and put it next to the trunking and see if it do clear it im not sure it will, on the plus side your walls look pretty straight
 
Joined
19 Dec 2009
Messages
2,729
Reaction score
418
Location
Hampshire
Country
United Kingdom
its supposed to be around 11mm with the skim coat at 2-3mm leaving the wires running along the surface will more or less double your thickness of base coat making it 2x as expensive also take your 19mm guide and put it next to the trunking and see if it do clear it im not sure it will, on the plus side your walls look pretty straight
just to add I freehand most of my floating but if it was my kitchen I would run screeds up the walls so I know they are nice and level and get the walls nice and plumb ready for the kitchen units
 
M

marsaday

Cheers. That's my first go at a block wall. Off to get my lats tomorrow so will see if the electrics can fit in as they are.
 
Joined
25 Oct 2008
Messages
1,180
Reaction score
144
Location
Cheshire
Country
United Kingdom
Cheers. That's my first go at a block wall. Off to get my lats tomorrow so will see if the electrics can fit in as they are.

If you're floating, go with as Steve suggests with screeds.
The first time I did it I ran long lengths of wood about full wall height, but they were very difficult to get out.
From now on I use smaller bits of wood and run screeds between them and work from this ( if this graphic makes sense).
E.g. |============|
Much easier.
 
M

marsaday

Do you not take them out very quickly ? Do the screed and get it flat, then remove the batons ? Don't wait until it all goes off ?

I will see how it all goes next week i suppose.

Just bought my straight edge and lats this morning !
 
Joined
19 Jan 2008
Messages
2,373
Reaction score
429
Country
United Kingdom
Hi marasday If you look in my albums there is one album called "dabbing walls" that should give you an idea of one way of getting your walls plumb, ;)
 
M

marsaday

Hi Roy

Good pics and they show how to do it pretty clearly.

How long do you let the formed channels go off for before you start infilling ?

When you put on the PVA how long do you have to wait before you start to add the plaster ?
 
Joined
25 Oct 2008
Messages
1,180
Reaction score
144
Location
Cheshire
Country
United Kingdom
Do you not take them out very quickly ? Do the screed and get it flat, then remove the batons ? Don't wait until it all goes off?

Oh yes, I tried to get them out quickly and not wait until it was set - but I found that the little dabs of plaster underneath to stick the batons on initially had set quickly. Also the fact that the long batons were then surrounded with wet plaster. Both these things meant they were on quite firm and didn't want to come out easy!
I ran round them with a Stanley knife to help release, but were still a bu**er and caused a bit of local damage to the wet nearby plaster in coming out. Easy enough to remedy, but wasn't the best way to go. I shared this as there was a chance you could have gone the same way - not advocating this approach at all!

Roy's pics are excellent and show the best approach.
Vertical orientation for the screeds is also easier to use you straight edge too.
 
Joined
19 Jan 2008
Messages
2,373
Reaction score
429
Country
United Kingdom
I set all the dabs up first and let them firm up then fill the gaps between the dabs in (screeds) and even before the screeds have gone off but firmed up a bit you can knock the wooden dabs out and fill the gaps in with your muck and just use a small straight edge to gently screed over where the dabs were as the screeds will be firm enough to do it, or you can dig them out and fill the gaps in when the screeds have gone off completely.( I shouldn't be telling you this but when I did the screeds I put a little cement in the mix to firm them up quicker) But you do it the proper way and if the gaps between the dabs are quite deep don't try and get it out in one coat. Work your way round and fill them in and let them "pick" up and add more muck to build them out.. I used sbr to kill the suction soaked the wall with a roller and built the screeds out in a couple of coats make sure you get a "tight" coat on between the screeds as this coat will be the one that holds it all together...Good Luck,,,,
 

DIYnot Local

Staff member

If you need to find a tradesperson to get your job done, please try our local search below, or if you are doing it yourself you can find suppliers local to you.

Select the supplier or trade you require, enter your location to begin your search.


Are you a trade or supplier? You can create your listing free at DIYnot Local

 
Sponsored Links
Top