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Potential Barn conversion Hiccup?

Discussion in 'Building' started by Henny, 25 Aug 2005.

  1. Henny

    Henny

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    Hi guys,

    I have the opportunity of purchasing some land which is next door to my property. It is all dis-used farmland with a single storey barn with the potential of becoming a dwelling. Before diving in I approached the Planning Dept and they have told me that it should first become a commercial property i.e offices or even a craft shed (Pottery etc.) The barn is in a not bad state and could be converted quite easily. I do not understand why a barn in a run-down state is better to be a commercial property than a residential property. Is there any guidance or websites where I may look into this further. Has anyone any tips on how I can get round this??

    The Planning Officer also told me I had to be seen researching it's commercial prospect, market it for a reasonable time at a reasonable price and if that had no comeback, then I could apply for a Residentail Dwelling, otherwise it would be rejected. Does that sound right??

    Henny
     
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  3. David E

    David E

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    Depending where you are you could try for permission to convert it to holiday accomodation, thus converting it to a "residential" property and then sort out obtaining permission to live there perminantly
     
  4. Henny

    Henny

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    i am currently living in Lincolnshire!

    Henny
     
  5. David E

    David E

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    Presumably people holiday in Lincoln, therefore perfect reason to convert it to holiday (residential if the planners don't pick up on it) accomodation.
     
  6. HandyJon

    HandyJon

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    Yep that sounds right.

    Have a look at your council's development plan. Check to see what your land is classified as. If it's outside the residential area then you will have to really prove that a house is valid. Also, the develpment plan will indicate what the council wants to see happen in certain areas - it sounds like employment is a key factor in your counciul's plan.

    If you really really want to develop on the site, then try a planning consultant who can give you advice about how to work the system. They're not cheap, but they can be very useful.
     
  7. Henny

    Henny

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    Thanks for all your replies guys!

    What if I can obtain Outline planning permission for a dwelling, would that guarantee it could be built?

    Henny
     
  8. TexMex

    TexMex

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    Applying for outline planning permission now could well back fire on you. So far the advice you have been given has been unofficial. If you now go ahead with OP for a residential dwelling, they may well grant it with some pretty hefty conditions attached. Imagine you get the OP with a condition that it includes X amount of retail space, and is only occupied by persons employed in business conducted from the said retail space. You will then have commited yourself to a very restrictive market for the new property. (only those interested in running their own retail establishment from home would be eligable to buy the property).

    Alternatively, they may add a clause "only to be occupied by persons actively employed in agriculture, forestry or related trade". Once again, the restriction of your potential market, for the completed property, will drive the price down.

    The best way of getting a favourable result from your planning office, is to co-operate with their suggestions. Something you need to bear in mind, is that, once there is planning permission in place, the value of the property will drastically increase. If you don't own the property when this is granted, you will be the one paying the increased price.

    If I was in your position, I would probably buy the land now, and then jump through all the hoops to get the PP that you want. Obviously it's a gambol, as you have no garuntee that you will get any permission whatsoever.

    You could hedge your bets, by offering the seller, the bare value of the property, (in it's current state and without PP) and include a claw back clause in the contract.

    If you get this sort of arrangement in place, in the event of no PP being granted, you still have a property worth, approximately, what you paid for it. If, however, you get the PP. You pay your vendor a percentage of it's increased value (something like 15% is quite normal).

    From your vendors point of view, he gets the value of the property in its current state, no matter what. But in the event that it turns into a little gold mine, he gets a cut.
     
  9. DIYnot Local

    DIYnot Local

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