Primed MDF Skirting and Architrave and Doors to paint

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I am having my mdf skirting and architrave installed in about 2 weeks so I want to plan ahead and get the correct paints.

I want a satin finish and have a local Crown and Johnsons decorator centre.

So for primed - do I need 2 undercoats plus one top. or one undercoat plus two top coats.

Also I have doors to paint - they are primed doors - so can I use the same undercoat and paint as for the mdf or is there a different paint.

Looking at white for skirting and architrave and possibly a different colour for the doors.

Do I paint the doors before getting them hanged or afterwards? The same goes for the skirting.

The walls have their mist coat so they need painting as well - do I paint the walls first and then get the skirting fitted?
 
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Fit skirting before painting wall.
Buy an acrylic primer/undercoat. Use this for all woodwork and then two top coats.
Hang doors before painting as fitter is bound to need to shave a bit off them.
I know doors will say rrady primed but likely to have bare edges after fitting so a quick coat of the primer/undercoat will be good.
 
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Fit skirting before painting wall.
Buy an acrylic primer/undercoat. Use this for all woodwork and then two top coats.
Hang doors before painting as fitter is bound to need to shave a bit off them.
I know doors will say rrady primed but likely to have bare edges after fitting so a quick coat of the primer/undercoat will be good.

Exactly this
 
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Avoid mdf skirting boards and architraves.

If they should get wet, they swell and warp beyond reasonable repair.
 
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Fit skirting before painting wall.
Buy an acrylic primer/undercoat. Use this for all woodwork and then two top coats.
Hang doors before painting as fitter is bound to need to shave a bit off them.
I know doors will say rrady primed but likely to have bare edges after fitting so a quick coat of the primer/undercoat will be good.

So after doors are fitted do I remove them to paint them. I will have carpets fitted as well so would it be best to get a piece of the carpet and then get the doors hung to accommodate the carpet?

Acryclic pimer / undercoat- would that be Johnsons Aqua guard? What would Crown equivalent be?

I would like to buy everything from either Johnsons or Crown. I think I will be using covaplus as the wall paint.
 
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If you're confident, leave the doors on. Put some newspaper underneath before painting or a dust sheet. Remove the handles too.
I use Leyland primer/undercoat. It's usually about 14 quid for 2.5 litres. It's water based and dry in an hour. Crown will do something similar. Probably called quick dry primer/undercoat
 
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Putting a piece of the carpet before hanging doors is a good idea if you're hanging them before the carpet goes down. Also the underlay!
 
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Putting a piece of the carpet before hanging doors is a good idea if you're hanging them before the carpet goes down. Also the underlay!

Definitely hanging the doors before the carpet goes down.

I was even thinking of painting the doors before they are hung but it seems that they would need to adjusted to get hung and in the end get loads of marks on them.

Ideally I would like to get doors hung with the carpet piece, then paint the doors whilst there is no carpet and then get the carpet fitted.

How hard is it to paint doors vertically than if they were lying on a table?

Use a roller or Brush?
 
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Are they panelled doors?
I'd always paint them hung. If you paint them lying down all the dust and bits in the air land on them.
I'm a brush guy.
 
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To paint a door I get the paint on quickly with a roller and follow behind with a brush. It is fine to paint them in-situ but you may struggle with the hinge side depending how much they open (some of my doors are adjacent to walls so they have to come off to paint). Even if they come off, stand them on blocks - as Chivas says, you don't want dust landing on them.

I also use Leyland acrylic undercoat. Johnstones do an 'Aqua Guard' water-based satin and Aqua Undercoat that can be used together.

If you haven't done this before you may be surprised how quickly the water-based finish coats dry, but the benefit of them over oil is that they won't yellow. My best advice is to get the paint on quickly and leave it alone - the paint skins very quickly and any touch-ups after about 10 mins will just make it worse.
 
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Avoid mdf skirting boards and architraves.

If they should get wet, they swell and warp beyond reasonable repair.

I have to admit that I am not a fan of MDF moldings, perhaps for a different reason though. I just hate the supplied pre-primed quality of finish. I have no problem with wood grain on timber moldings but I find that I end up sanding MDF moldings so much that I need to re-prime them and then sand that "grain" swell too.

MDF isn't very forgiving when it comes to vacuum cleaner knocks on external corners or general wear and tear on architraves. That said, I understand why people use it.
 
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I have to admit that I am not a fan of MDF moldings, perhaps for a different reason though. I just hate the supplied pre-primed quality of finish. I have no problem with wood grain on timber moldings but I find that I end up sanding MDF moldings so much that I need to re-prime them and then sand that "grain" swell too.

MDF isn't very forgiving when it comes to vacuum cleaner knocks on external corners or general wear and tear on architraves. That said, I understand why people use it.

My issue with wood architraves and skirting is warping. So unless I can pick all the boards myself (who will allow me to do that?)
 
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My issue with wood architraves and skirting is warping. So unless I can pick all the boards myself (who will allow me to do that?)

Agreed, that can be a problem if buying over the web, especially if buying from a DIY shed. I have never had a problem walking in to a timber merchant and choosing the timber that I want to be delivered.
 
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