Quote for two Lintels

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I have a problem with two windows in the gable end of my semi-detached property. The 1947 property does not have lintels and s such and uses upright "soldier" bricks above the window. The bricks in one of the windows are now bowing out slightly from the wall due to excessive pressure (more than likely due to a shoddy window installation before I purchased the property). See attached photo.

The quote I have received is as follows :
Pin and prop structure, remove deformed and cracked brickwork, insert new L9 lintel, rebuild brickwork and make good plasterwork, leave ready for decoration. Include
helical reinforcement bars to any remaining cracks as required.

Eachl lintel installation to cost £1950 excluding VAT so for 2 lintels that's a total of £4680 inc' VAT. This does not include the costs of scaffolding.

It seems expensive to me but I have no idea of the general costs of these things.

I know the building company is a good professional outfit and it has been so difficult to even get a builder to come and give a quote due to high demand.

Is this quote in the ball park?

Thanks

Rob
 

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Chances are a 1947 house will have cavity walls therefore it is probably only the outer leaf of brickwork that is deflecting. I would suspect the inner leaf has a perfectly good concrete lintel.

The only "L9" lintel I can see on Google is for a 9 inch solid wall and the fact they are quoting to make good plaster suggests that they think it is a solid wall and they intend to replace the entire lintel. You probably need to check how thick your wall is to make sure they have quoted for the right work.

Either way the price quoted is very expensive and I would expect it to be around half that cost. Also once the lintel is replaced the helical bars are completely pointless so that is a waste of money.
 
My house is also 1947 and has soldier courses on the outer skin. However, inside and on the inner leaf there are concrete lintels (wood upstairs) -- has it definitely been confirmed that there are no lintels (pardon the question)?

No hard and fast rules on cavity walls during that period. I can think of plenty of solid brick developments in the East Midlands from just after the war. Materials scarce then. A clear picture of one of your outside walls should help confirm.
 
Thanks for the reply.

I'm really in the dark about all this and just want to get some extra information before going back to the builders who supplied the quote.

The initials structural engineer's report did suggest IG L9 lintels and he was aware it was a cavity wall: "We recommend that the distorted and damaged bricks above the gable bathroom window are removed a new Lintel is provided above the opening. IG L9 Solid Wall Lintel or similar approved."

I've no idea about the helical bars unless they are referring to the other cracks on the gable wall. It should be said I also have to have general repair work on the gable end and many spalled bricks replaced.

Additionally there are no internal cracks through the plaster at the windows and this issue could have been there well before we bought the house in 2016. The building certainly hasn't got worse since we moved in but it does worry me.

I agree it does seem overpriced.
 
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My house is also 1947 and has soldier courses on the outer skin. However, inside and on the inner leaf there are concrete lintels (wood upstairs) -- has it definitely been confirmed that there are no lintels (pardon the question)?

No hard and fast rules on cavity walls during that period. I can think of plenty of solid brick developments in the East Midlands from just after the war. Materials scarce then. A clear picture of one of your outside walls should help confirm.
How would I be able to check if there are concrete lintels on the inner skin?
 

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How would I be able to check if there are concrete lintels on the inner skin?

Through removal of the interior plasterwork -- only enough to reveal what's underneath. It can be patched back up easily.

I had an extension in 2021 and removed the old rear door. Prior to removal I was expecting to find no lintel (having seen the soldier course outside), but I chiseled a small hole above the opening on the inside to find a concrete lintel above the opening. Upstairs are wooden for some reason (as I say, materials were scarce in 1947) and the lintel for the coal bunker under the house is actually a concete fence post!

P.S. having just seen your earlier post, it seems it has been confirmed that you have cavity walls. This would invalidate my advice based on a solid wall.
 
personally i cannot see what wrong with the brickwork, looks exactly like a lot of the chucked up post war houses. I suspect that was like that from the day it was made.
 
personally i cannot see what wrong with the brickwork, looks exactly like a lot of the chucked up post war houses. I suspect that was like that from the day it was made.
Admittedly it's not the best photo. It's raining and I
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couldn't be bothered getting the ladders out. The area within the red boundary shows a large crack. This is a separate issue to the problem with the soldier bricks and is easily fixed. The soldier bricks (outlined in green) are angled outwards although it's hard to see in a photo. The entire repair costs for the wall fall in at £10,000!!!
 

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