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router

Discussion in 'Tools and Materials' started by Hudson1984, 27 Dec 2019.

  1. Hudson1984

    Hudson1984

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    Hi all, thinking of adding a router to the tool collection.

    Now, i've never used one. Not even once!

    I'm hoping to be able to do nice edges (i'd like to make a cribbage board) i.e. chamfered edges

    I'd also like to round of holes etc.

    do I look for a table router or handheld...or both!

    I like the idea of a table router, run long lengths through but also a handheld or one that does both..... ARGH! options!

    I'd really love to be able to make some furniture long term and think I need a router.
     
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  3. JobAndKnock

    JobAndKnock

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    I feel that the issue is one of scale. Router tables are generally pretty small things and home workers are further constrained by working space issues, so you'll probably never be able to support anything even as big as a dining table top on a router table because the router tables most folk (who own them) have are generally just too small to support anything of any size. As for running a profile edge on a 5ft long dining table top, I hope that if you do try it you've got 12ft or 14ft plus workspace to do the task (i.e. 2 x table top length plus 2ft to stand yourself in - 4ft if you have an assistant). That tends to restrict them to running shorter lengths of moulding and dealing with small scale projects IMHO. Whilst they can be useful for this, for many home projects a plunge router used freehand, or with fences, or with jigs and templates will probably be far more versatile - at least in the beginning. Personally I don't believe most of what I've seen written (especially by American amateur woodworkers) on the subject of router tables and how necessary they are. A plunge router used freehand is far more versatile than any router table with the sole exception of its' inability to undertake tasks such as making fielded panels safely (and in any case a plunge router fitted beneath a sheet of plywood with a fine adjuster makes a basic router table)

    In all probability you'll be better off starting small with something like a Makita RT0700 or the Chinese clone version of it the Katsu router. This will allow you to learn all the principles and get used to using a router without spending too much money. It will also be useful as a detail (or trim) router for doing smaller mouldings; maybe I should point out that until the mid to late 1960s most routers available even to the trade were 600 watts or less and had a 1/4in collet, so there's a lot you can achieve with even a small router. Later on if you feel the need to do larger, heavier tasks then a 1/2in router would probably be the way to go. Many router users eventually end up with two or more routers as the big routers have the power to do all sorts of things but are difficult to use on small surfaces and for delicate work
     
  4. opps

    opps

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    I'd second JobandKnock's advice.

    A router table will allow you make small mouldings, something you won't be able to do unless you use wide stock timber and then rip them down on a table saw after.

    I have an old Dewalt 1/2" router. Personally I find it too cumbersome for things like door hinges and invariably end up borrowing smaller routers.

    The Makita looks pretty good but I'd recommend buying the version with the different bases, especially if you want to use it with a router table, the price however jumps from £120 to £220.

    Depending on how deep your pockets are, you can buy powered router tables which will free up your router.

    eg https://www.rutlands.co.uk/sp+power...e-with-height-adjustment-rutlands+dk2080#nogo

    Whenever using a router, do not start it under load and never force it. Work in the direction that the bit spins (unless you are fluting where it doesn't matter). They can be very unforgiving so take the necessary safety precautions. What youtube starter videos before you even turn it on.
     
  5. JobAndKnock

    JobAndKnock

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    Which is why I suggested the (much cheaper) Katsu. I actually have both a 110 volt Makita and a 110 volt Katsu, both with plunge, fixed and tilt bases (bought when we needed to run two routers on hinge recessing simultaneously for a few weeks and I really didn't want to shell out on a second Makita). The Katsu, whilst a bit rougher around the edges is compatible with the Makita - the bases interchange, the collets and collet nuts interchange, even the brushes are the same. The only difference I can see is that the plastic sub-base on the Katsu won't take a Porter-Cable guide bush like the Makita does (solution - buy a Makita sub-base and fit that, c. £6)
     
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  6. wgt52

    wgt52

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    Can only agree. Get yourself a small one as the suggestions above. The Katsu one with all accessories is circa £80 on line, e.g..

    Maybe go to show where you can try one or more out. Certainly talk to the dealers, importers or manufacturers at a show.

    Buy a 'small' selction box of bits - no more than 12 bits; saying that screwfix have a 4bit Makita set for £20 or a 6bit Trend set for £25, either of which will set up nicely. You can always buy additional bits as and when later. The Bit I use the most is 1/2'' straight followed by 3/8'' roundover. Of the 'starter' set I have (and had for 6 years) I've only used 4 of the bits out of the 12.

    Get used to using that combination before considering another, larger, more powerful machine.

    Our suggestions are not to stop you from using one but because we are thinking of your safety and pleasure in using one.

    Router tables under £100 are AFAICS clones and Aldi is the cheapest of the clones. Such tables are not necessarily rigid or 'square'. Once you get used to a Router and wish to use a larger machine including in a table then you really need to one that is suited for use in a table with the hight adjusted accessible from and through the router base (Trend T11, Triton TRA001 or similar) and a suitable table. You may it better to make yourself a table once yo know what yo want.
     
  7. Ryler

    Ryler

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    Why do people post that latin crap for?
    To post "around" is just one more letter ffs.
     
    Last edited: 30 Dec 2019
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  9. JobAndKnock

    JobAndKnock

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    The use of some Latin terms is quite widespread in English, e.g. "e.g.", "etc", "extra", "i.e.", "per se", "quid pro quo", "ad hoc", "de facto", etc. The fact is that much of the language you and I speak, read and write every day is based at least in part on Latin and the Latin-languages, particularly French. Being a "mongrel language" (apparently "mongrel" is Middle English, derived from German) which is continuously evolving English has acquired a wider range of words from other languages and cultures than any other language on earth, so we have "bungalow", "chintz", "jungle", "verandah", "juggernaut", "shampoo" and "thug" (amongst many others) from Hindi, "alcohol", "coffee", "cotton" and "mattress" are derived from Arabic, whilst "Europe", "democracy" and "Cycnicism" are derived from ancient Greek. So surely it's a matter of how or where you were brought-up and educated, and it may even be generational, as to how, when and where you use commonly understood Latin words and/or abbreviations. I often use "c." as an abbreviation for "circa" (see a previous post above). It's a widely recognised abbreviation in English, appears in the OED (Oxford English Dictionary - another recognised abbreviation) and is much used by the printing trade. "ffs." on the other hand.......
     
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  10. JohnD

    JohnD

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    but unnecessary.

    The purpose used to be to show off that the speaker had studied classical literature, to give a spurious impression of education and intelligence, even though the speaker might be an ignorant simpleton. Apart from Buffoon Johnson, few people now use it in that way.
     
  11. JobAndKnock

    JobAndKnock

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    So you don't use "etc", "i.e." or "e.g." then? I don't have a classical education, but I use those - and many others - and I'm not alone in doing so. The thing about language is that it changes with generations - I'm now past retirement age and I've no doubt that there are quite a few terms I use which are no longer used by people in their twenties. So what? It doesn't mean that I, or others like me, are either simpletons trying to look intelligent or that we studied the classics. Assuming that indicates a potential degree of political correctness that I didn't think you were capable of. Or should we all be used "newspeak" these days to keep the snowflakes happy?
     
    Last edited: 30 Dec 2019
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  12. stealthwolf

    stealthwolf

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    I've used circa since primary school. I've never studied classical literature or Latin. It's common parlance when discussing historical dates. Less so for other uses. as J&K pointed out, language changes. In a few years, people will talk about how "they're", "their" and "there" are all confusing and should be replaced with a single a "theiyre" to make it easier for everyone.
     
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  13. opps

    opps

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    Meh, let's just move on to Big Brother's Newspeak and let the Proles stick with Oldspeak.

    Only then will things be doubleplusgood.

    Seriously though... people take umbrage* with the use of words such as circa?

    * and yes I am aware that umbrage is based upon the French word ombrage which in turn is based upon the Latin term umbrāticus. I guess I could have used a synonym such as "offence" but that too is based upon a French term which is derived from Latin (offensa).

    Oh, and I went to a state comprehensive and have never voted Tory.
     
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  14. Ryler

    Ryler

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    Have two Hitachi M12v2 routers. One 240v, the other 110v.
    The 110v version is hardly worth taking out of the box it is so under powered.

    The Triton TRA001 is about the same price but is 2400w. And having only looked at the machine online think it would beat the m12v2 hands down.
     
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