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Sealing the bath. Do length or width first?

Discussion in 'Decorating and Painting' started by chainsaw_masochist, 16 Jul 2007.

  1. chainsaw_masochist

    chainsaw_masochist

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    I have to seal around the edge of an acrylic bath against a tiled wall – a task that I have not performed previously. I have had a good look at previous posts on this subject and very helpful they are too, describing quite a few different ways to achieve an ideal finish. One question remains, though. Should the bath length be sealed prior to the width or vice versa? Or, alternatively should the two sides be sealed in effectively one continuous action?
     
  2. Softus

    Softus

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    It really doesn't make any difference, but I normally do the hardest bit first.
     
  3. esra_ptrap

    esra_ptrap

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    So do I, which is worrying as I've found myself agreeing with Softus on something :LOL:
     
  4. Softus

    Softus

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    I'll make it easy for you esra....

    No you haven't. :D
     
  5. chainsaw_masochist

    chainsaw_masochist

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    Sorry for not getting back to you guys very quickly. I probably should have mentioned that I am doing this work for a friend who is about to sell his flat. It was drawn to his attention by the estate agent that the bathroom had been noted by a potential purchaser’s surveyor as very damp. He (the friend) wanted to have the bath resealed (between bath and tiles). Having removed the original sealant (which was very mouldy) I can now see that the gap between the (acrylic) bath and the tiles is not uniform. At the tap end there is a gap of about 6mm, at the other end 4mmm and in the middle barely 1mm. :cry: As I said, I have not run sealant around a bath before but am starting to suspect that this is likely to result in a poor finish, inexperience not withstanding. Any views? :confused:
     
  6. Softus

    Softus

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    My views are:

    1. If the bathroom is very damp then it's lacking in air changes. Does it have an extractor fan, and a means of fresh air inlet (not the window)?

    2. If the silicone sealant was mouldy, it was probably a cheap and nasty product - use Dow Corning 785.

    3. The varying gap isn't too much of a problem. The way I would deal with this is to first lay a foundation to fill the deep crevices only. Push the nozzle slightly into the areas where the gap is wide, such that the sealant comes to about 2mm shy of the finished tile surface. 12 hours later you can apply the finishing layer. If you can't find any suitable topics to guide you in doing this then post back here and I'll find one for you.
     
  7. andy2306

    andy2306

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    Fill the bath first!! just in case you hadnt realised
     
  8. chainsaw_masochist

    chainsaw_masochist

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    Yes, the bathroom is very damp indeed. No, it does not have an extractor fan, only a single air brick.

    I thought this might be the case. No worries there as I've got me DC 785 ready for action. ;)


    Right, I'm genner do it as you advise, Softus. Do you reckon it to be necessary to leave the the bath full after sealing (Part 1) in anticipation for sealing (Part 2).

    Point well made, Andy.
     
  9. chainsaw_masochist

    chainsaw_masochist

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    Only just been able to complete the job so a bit late getting back for the update. Anyway, followed Softus' advice to the 't' and the results are really pretty good. Doing the sealing in two stages in this situation is a good move. Thanks very much for all your help. ;)
     
  10. DIYnot Local

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