Silicone sealant

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a question for the older members: has it improved?

I have used decorators caulk and acryclic sealant (but it cracks) and can get a neat finish smoothing it with a wetted spatula or finger, and it washes off easily when fresh.

last time I tried using silicone sealant from a gun, I found it very sticky and messy and I could not smooth it neatly. I got it on my fingers and it was too sticky to get off.

I guess I am afraid to use it again but I have a shower cubicle to seal, and have heard it is good for bedding glass panes in the front door.

maybe I am just clumsy, has it got easier to use over the past 10 years or so? how do you smooth it without it sticking to the tool and dragging up?
 
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I'm not one of the 'older members' but I hope I can offer you advice!

Use one of the better brands of silicone as the water content will be less than the cheap stuff.

Two ways of smoothing off:

1 - wet finger with soapy water
2 - spray soapy water onto silicone and smooth off

The golden rule is to not put too much on otherwise it will create a mess.

Keep some 'Industrial Wipes' or 'Gorrilla wipes' handy as they will take of any excess silicone.
 
Some of the cheaper ones may be more 'runny' than others, but it may be just technique.

Also there are two different basic types - a neutral cure and another type. You may well have to google unless someone here knows, but IIRC, one smells of vinegar and the other doesn't, and one responds better to smoothing and one is faster drying

Wadge has covered everything else.

Just make sure hat you get a sanitary grade sealant - as this will resist mould growth better.
 
last time I tried using silicone sealant from a gun, I found it very sticky and messy and I could not smooth it neatly. I got it on my fingers and it was too sticky to get off.
Follow wadge post but with surgical glove

I guess I am afraid to use it again but I have a shower cubicle to seal, and have heard it is good for bedding glass panes in the front door.
Have you tried 791 dow cornering? Tend to be a bit thicker to put on, Softus recommend it and not has any problem in my shower, it's the first sealant that hasn't got any black mould yet, normally I re-seal once a year with others sealant
 
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swbjackson, I have seen them, have you any experience with them?
 
I have a fugi kit and it is excellent on straight runs such as shower trays and baths, it can be tricky to use behind taps so I still use the conventional method in these cases.

I use Dow Corning 785

http://www.geocel.co.uk/product.aspx?id=2&pr=dc7s

You won't find this in B&Q or the like, go to your local plumbers merchant, I pay between £2 and £3 for it. It is the best I have found over the years and I have tried a few. It is better than some costing 3 times as much in the sheds.

To avoid silicone going everywhere mask off around where you are sealing, you can use electricians tape for this or standard masking tape.

Clean the area to be sealed with methylated spirits (not white spirit as this is oil based) to remove soap scum, fat etc etc.
 
I've had a Fugi kit sat in my tool box for sometime. I had the occassion to use it for the first time about 3 weeks ago, have to say that I was really impressed with it. Produced a really neat finish on a shower tray we were fitting.
 
Hmm those Fugi kits look pretty nifty may have to pick one up. Although I've always used my finger before with good results. You get a knack for it after and you can angle the your finger in such a way that it removes the access from both sides of the wall, a problem sometimes brought on by overloading.
 
I got mine when I was doing bathroom replacements in a hotel. It was all really good quality stuff and a rubbish finish on the silicone would have spoilt it. It really came into it's own when I was using black silicone to seal between the black marble worktop and coloured tiling in the ladies and gents toilets that we refurbished in the same hotel.
 
Well I recently bought a special stick thing from Wickes which I reckon is going to alleviate the problems (and the thought of problems) when doing siliconing.
It's basically like a rubber finger.
The trouble with fingers is that as you start to smooth, your finger starts to form into a corner, and sooner or later, your "bead" becomes a smear.
This things stays firm, and so as you press it into the corner and draw it along, the bead stays as a bead. The excess forms a separate dribble down each side, but it's properly separate from the main bead, so you can peel the dribbles off once dry.
I've tried it once or twice. Feels like cheating!
 

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