skimming existing plaster

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Need to skim over a wall in the kitchen and have decided to give it a go myself.Had a look round the site and picked up loads of advice but just got 1 question

When do I apply the second skim coat?
Is it a case of get the first coat on then put the second on straight away
Or
apply first coat,dry trowel till flat then apply second coat
Or
none of the above

tia phil
 
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I am new to this as well. I have had most of the large walls in my house done professionally but decided that I wanted to have a go myself on the smaller rooms. I have so far plastered my bathroom and small bedroom with good results. I have had some great advice from this forum along the way.

I get the first coat on as flat as possible and then get the second coat on straight away. The second coat will allow you to get the surface really flat. 2/3ds of the bucket on the first coat and leave the last 3rd for the second coat. Don't make the same mistake I made on my first attempt. make sure that the plaster has gone off before closing down. You should be able to put your finger on the plaster without leaving an imprint. Too early and you will get bubbles under the plaster and if you are too late you will not be able to smooth out.

good luck
 
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Cheers guys

@brist-yep thats one of the bits of advice I picked up from here(1st coat 4:1 pva:water-allow to dry. Second coat 2:1 wait till tacky)

@marlb-must admit done some plastering bout 15 years ago (dads bedroom walls and ceiling) but memory fades and couldn`t remember how we went about doing the skim coat so thought I`d better ask. Only stuff I`ve done since is a bit of patching with one coat stuff-never again,don`t know whether it was just me/my technique but didnt seem to be one thing (browning) or the other (finish)

Oh and one more question if I may (theres always one more question), would I be better off treating myself to a plastering trowel or a finishing trowel, seems that Marshalltown get a good press round these parts
 
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Marshalltown yes wouldnt be without it,make sure its stainless steel though,will cost about £30 for a 14 inch trowel.
 
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Cheers brist guess I`ll go with Marshalltown but still wondering if I`d be better with a plastering or finishing trowel?
 
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Phil,
A Stainless Steel Marshalltown PLASTERING trowel is also a top quality FINISHING trowel. It is one and the same. You do get other types of trowels for cement,concrete etc,but in plastering, a Marshalltown S/Steel Plastering Trowel is a top notch brand finishing trowel,although this is always a personal opinion of the user.

Roughcaster.
 
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Thanks roughcaster,the only reason that I was asking was I`d had a look on screwfix and they have both finishing and plastering trowels and wasn`t sure of the difference

Thanks for the info

appreciated

Phil
 
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I don't know any plasterers that use Marshalltown. They use Ragni around here. Half the price and a better tool.
 
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I don't know any plasterers that use Marshalltown. They use Ragni around here. Half the price and a better tool.

to say one trowel is better than the other is ridiculous.

one's opinion of any tool is subjective.

if a majority of tradesmen on this forum suggest Marshaltown to be their trowel of choice then so be it. it does not automatically make it a better or worse trowel than the Ragni.

i used a Ragni for years. i have used a stainless, permashape, Marshaltown for the last four years and, in my opinion, is streets ahead of the Ragni. the springy steel is remarkable. the Ragni loses its shape too quickly.

when i was younger all the spreads used Tyzack wooden handled fellas. ;)
 
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They are expensive Jo as you say.I don't use a M/town trowel and never have,as I said earlier it's a personal choice.The trowels that I have used over the years is Tyzack pat.216 S/steel,and they also are not as expensive as M/town.It's the name your paying for.At the end of the day,it's the quality of the plastering that counts.

Roughcaster.
 
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