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Small table saw

Discussion in 'Tools and Materials' started by Magrah, 9 Jun 2018.

  1. Magrah

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    Hi all

    I'm in the market for a small table saw for DIY. I'm thinking of the Ferm TSM1032 or the Scheppach HS80. Ideally i'd like it as quiet as possible, the Ferm comes with ear plugs which puts me off!

    Anyone have one of these or have tried one? Any other recommendations?

    Many thanks

    Magragh
     
  2. pete50

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    I have a Scheppach HS80 and it aint quiet. I didn't get any earplugs with mine either. I don't think you will find a quiet small DIY table saw.
     
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  3. Magrah

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    Thanks, are you happy with it? Ferm is meant to be a good brand? Most of my power tools are Dewalt though I've a Rexon mitre saw and bansaw which I'm very pleased with.
     
  4. foxhole

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    Both cheap brands but most table saws are cheap at that size . Ear plugs should be used with most power tools but few bother.
    No such thing as a quiet saw.
     
  5. pete50

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    I'm happy with my Sheppach. It does what I want it to do and in my opinion it is one of the better ones of the cheapies. It aint no Dewalt though.
     
  6. SammyInnit

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    What are you doing with it? Just rough rips or anything with any level of precision?
     
  7. Magrah

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    Bit of both if I'm honest.
     
  8. pete50

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    I don't think I could get "precision" with mine without a lot of faffing. The sticky backed plastic ruler isn't that good and the pointer can move. Mine rips rough wood which is all I bought it for. I've also found that the extension moves slightly and if the fence is clamped to that then "precision" goes right out of the window. If you want precision your going to have to spend a couple of thousand and have a massive shed with a perfectly laid, smooth, concrete floor that never gets dirty or has any shavings hanging about. All your tools, enough to build a large three master wooden ship, need to be hung on the walls behind you all looking pristine and not used. Then, the coup de grasse, make a You Tube Video.
     
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  9. SammyInnit

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    The models mentioned might be good for ripping bits down but you're never going to get anything like decent results so precision is out the window. I used to have a TS which retails around £600 and even that had its drawbacks.

    I did however sell it after I almost had one of my fingers off (my own fault but it put me off using it again) and now I do just about all ripping with my cordless tracksaw or for dimensional timber I have a 14" band saw then put it through the planer thicknesser to bring it to square/flat dimension.

    Given the capacity and price I'd probably buy a 235mm circular saw as you can get some of the better ones for similar money. Tables that small you're going to limited to what it will accomodate with any stability.
     
  10. Roger928

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    If your out on site and want to remove 10mm from a 40mm lath then a table saw is invaluable.
     
  11. SammyInnit

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    If you were on site you wouldn't be taking either of the models mentioned to work.
     
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  12. Roger928

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    You could take both and if one broke down, you'd have the other as a spare.:ROFLMAO:
     
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  13. Roger928

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    Got a close up on this saw yesterday...
    [​IMG]
    It has a sliding table to the left. Didn't seem that smooth running. And dust will just clog it further.
    And not really sure of the benefits when you already have a T slot for the miter gauge.
     
  14. JobAndKnock

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    Don't see any advantage of having a mitre fence on what is essentially a site saw, especially as out on site you'll like as not have a mitre saw in nay case (which is far better for putting mitres onto the ends of long bits of timber - can't see anyone trying to put a bevel/mitre cut on the end of a 5 metre long piece of skirting using that table saw. Used to have an MLS100 (and yes dust does clog the sliding table up) and have used the 2704 (new, on hire) but prefer my own DW745 - smaller, lighter, better folding mobile stand design but smaller and still just as noisy
     
  15. geraldthehamster

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    I got an Aldi cheapo special last year (Workzone rebranded Einhell). Like all cheap saws you can improve them with upgrades. I seldom use the flappy fency that only clamps at one end, or rely on the scale, but instead clamp a 4 foot spirit level across it, and measure from datum points at each end. And cut a piece of test timber first to make sure everything is absolutely parallel. I also fitted a good quality blade when replacement was due. I don't think you can get this saw at the moment, and I wouldn't recommend it anyway. On reflection I should have spent more and bought something better. However, with the setup above, I've been able to make accurate edge-jointed panels from inch and a half timber, without using a jointer.
     
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