Smart meter installer - install isolator too?

Third meter installer just sealed up the cut-out fuse, his new meter and my isolator without a word of complaint. I did wonder about his need to seal up >MY< isolator, but I suppose because there were permanent live tail in the bottom(?).
I've never got my head around this point: DNO and agents have always insisted the load side tails from the meter belong to the customer but they terminate them into their meter and seal it. I've always thought the cover should be in 2 parts.

Now with an isolator, regardless of whose isolator it is, they seal as far as that [and on one occassion I'm aware of they had installed the isolator cover in such a way that the load side was locked by the supply side seal so defeating the purpose of the 2 part cover]. Even further, one of my properties I fitted a RCD ahead of the CU, when tenant had a PP meter fitted they also fitted an isolator and sealed : head, meter, isolator & my RCD and even placed 2 stickers on the CU. I've also seen matching seals on the Henley blocks.

Whenever I've needed access to the sealed end of my tails I've simply phoned DNO and advised them I'm breaking their seal and explained the reason, so far it's always worked out ok, sometimes they come out to inspect/seal, sometimes not.
 
Sponsored Links
I've never got my head around this point: DNO and agents have always insisted the load side tails from the meter belong to the customer but they terminate them into their meter and seal it. I've always thought the cover should be in 2 parts.

Nor I really, it is not as if there can be any theft on the consumer side. It can only be a matter of safety, access to live terminals, unless the fuse is pulled.
 
Sponsored Links
... Now with an isolator, regardless of whose isolator it is, they seal as far as that [and on one occassion I'm aware of they had installed the isolator cover in such a way that the load side was locked by the supply side seal so defeating the purpose of the 2 part cover].
For what it's worth, when they installed mine, they put a 'proper seal' on the supply side, and a Mickey Mouse plastic one on the load side - I guess to discourage non-electricians from 'tampering' with it. However, it's clear than anyone could remove those plastic seals (and would be under no obligation to replace them with anything ...


Kind Regards, John
Edit: where did my piccie go? - I'll try again in next post
 
Second time lucky? .....
 

Attachments

  • upload_2020-6-11_16-51-37.png
    upload_2020-6-11_16-51-37.png
    2.1 MB · Views: 168
I just pulled the cut-out fuse and fitted my own, ...
Take 'im down, lock 'im up, and throw away the key :whistle:
I've never got my head around this point: DNO and agents have always insisted the load side tails from the meter belong to the customer but they terminate them into their meter and seal it. I've always thought the cover should be in 2 parts.
On some it is, very sensible. But then it would add a few pence to the cost of a meter, which is presumably why it's not common. And sopme meters (the same ones ?) also have a built in isolator switch.
Now with an isolator, regardless of whose isolator it is, they seal as far as that [and on one occassion I'm aware of they had installed the isolator cover in such a way that the load side was locked by the supply side seal so defeating the purpose of the 2 part cover].
It's daft isn't it. When I had an isolator fitted, the guy sealed : the meter, the isolator (both ends, so including the removable bit over my terminals), and the henleys. The reason he gave was that "I'm required to seal anything I've touched" (meaning anything he's worked on, not literally anything he's touched). But he didn't seal the cutout (old design, presumably from the 1940s when the house was built) as he could not get a wire through the screw and eylet :whistle:
He also moved the meter to a daft location, and left a right pigs ear of the wiring :mad:

There's no more reason to seal the cover on an isolator than to seal the cover on a CU - which you'd never expect them to do, nor would you leave the seal in place when you needed access. As pointed out, once out of the meter, there's no opportunity for theft.
Second time lucky? .....
I like the notice on that, surely any self respecting bodger will always use an appropriately sized flat head screwdriver - you only try a hex key after you've chewed up your screwdriver and the screw head :whistle:
 
I like the notice on that, surely any self respecting bodger will always use an appropriately sized flat head screwdriver - you only try a hex key after you've chewed up your screwdriver and the screw head :whistle:
Yes, it is a rather intriguing label!

Kind Regards, John
 
Take 'im down, lock 'im up, and throw away the key :whistle:

On some it is, very sensible. But then it would add a few pence to the cost of a meter, which is presumably why it's not common. And sopme meters (the same ones ?) also have a built in isolator switch.

It's daft isn't it. When I had an isolator fitted, the guy sealed : the meter, the isolator (both ends, so including the removable bit over my terminals), and the henleys. The reason he gave was that "I'm required to seal anything I've touched" (meaning anything he's worked on, not literally anything he's touched). But he didn't seal the cutout (old design, presumably from the 1940s when the house was built) as he could not get a wire through the screw and eylet :whistle:
He also moved the meter to a daft location, and left a right pigs ear of the wiring :mad:

There's no more reason to seal the cover on an isolator than to seal the cover on a CU - which you'd never expect them to do, nor would you leave the seal in place when you needed access. As pointed out, once out of the meter, there's no opportunity for theft.

I like the notice on that, surely any self respecting bodger will always use an appropriately sized flat head screwdriver - you only try a hex key after you've chewed up your screwdriver and the screw head :whistle:
BUT... it says 'socket'.

From that I'd expect to find a male hex head [like a nut] however the picture looks like it's a female hex head.

The Proteus unit I fitted had female Torx heads.
 
I think we can interpret it as meaning a "driver to fit a 3mm hex socket". Not well worded, but not "non sensical" either.
What is annoying is when faced with "imperial" hex socket terminal screws and you only have metric drivers with you. A 6mm hex doesn't fit very well in a 1/4" socket - there's a limit to how much torque you can apply, but fortunately that was enough.
 
I think we can interpret it as meaning a "driver to fit a 3mm hex socket". Not well worded, but not "non sensical" either.
Agreed - I was in no doubt as to what it meant (once I had looked at the screw head). However, as you will know (e.g. as per a current thread) there are some for whom the argument "we all know what it means" doesn't go down very well :)

Kind Regards, John
 

DIYnot Local

Staff member

If you need to find a tradesperson to get your job done, please try our local search below, or if you are doing it yourself you can find suppliers local to you.

Select the supplier or trade you require, enter your location to begin your search.


Are you a trade or supplier? You can create your listing free at DIYnot Local

 
Sponsored Links
Back
Top