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thick plaster coat to hide rising damp?

Discussion in 'Plastering and Rendering' started by xelaris, 28 Oct 2013.

  1. xelaris

    xelaris

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    Removing some plaster of an old terrace house is proving to be more problematic than I initially thought.
    Hacking the plaster from about 1m up from the floor level is relatively easy (the plaster is probably a lime mixture) on the lower area the plaster is very hard and I believe there was a damp issue which was "corrected" somehow...
    Reading some articles about managing rising damp in old building I'm getting the idea that is probably better to remove the plaster anyway and try to address the damp problem (if any) in another way.
    Letting the old wall "breath" freely can be a solution but I'm planning to cover the same with insulated plasterboard with dot and dab or low expansion foam. Could this be a solution to let a bit of air running freely behind the insulated boards? Maybe there's going to be a 10mm gap due from irregularities of the wall and the unevenness of the fixing method used.
    Any suggestion?
     
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  3. PrenticeBoyofDerry

    PrenticeBoyofDerry

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    Having a gap between wall and board will allow for some ventilation.
    But as you have stated, first task is to investigate in to any further damp issues.
     
  4. xelaris

    xelaris

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    So, even a small gap is useful then....maybe it's worth planning ahead in how to use the low expansion foam (no problem with dot and dab) - i.e. ideally the foam sealant should allow a continuous stream of air, so the moisture is free to circulate from the bottom to the top of the wall?

    About the damp issues:
    This is a double leaf brick wall - there are holes drilled at about 100mm from the floor which suggest some silicone injection treatment. The bonding between the bricks and the plaster is really strong - the surface of the bricks isn't exactly damp but darker than usual but maybe this is because moisture wasn't allowed to escape....in a few days maybe they'll regain the original colour.
     
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