Treating damp spots

Discussion in 'Building' started by AndyDavis, 24 Jan 2010.

  1. AndyDavis

    AndyDavis

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    The dryer broke down before Christmas and I've been using a metal stand upstairs to dry the clothes. I've noticed some black (damp?) spots
    on the wall round one window and condensation on the window. All probably due to the humidity being a bit steep. Whats the best way of getting rid of them and keeping them away? I thought of washing it down with some sort of anti-fungal spray, but not sure which one.
     
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  3. nottsrob184

    nottsrob184

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    First you need to get it to dry out....depending on how bad it is you may need to dehumidify with a small unit, but i would think just opening windows and getting some air flowing will do.
    To repair the damp patch....test by tapping the plaster to see if its come loose...if not spray with a damp sealer a couple of times before repainting or papering....if plaster sounds hollow ...get it off , replaser etc.

    Cheers
     
  4. PrenticeBoyofDerry

    PrenticeBoyofDerry

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    You need to remove the moisture in the air or the mold spores will germinate. So deal with that as a priorty as nottsrob184's has said.
    The cheapest method is to treat with white vineger, spray this on to the area and leave to dry.
    This is also non toxic, so not harmful to children or pets.
     
  5. AndyDavis

    AndyDavis

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    The spots have just appeared so the paint and plaster are sound, for the moment!

    I'm trying to keep the window open to get rid of the humidity but there a newborn in the house so its a bit difficult. As its localised to a small corner of the room is there a small dehumidifier you can recommend. How long should I use it?

    Is the white vineger the same stuff you get in Tesco's or do I need to go to a diy shop?
     
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  7. PrenticeBoyofDerry

    PrenticeBoyofDerry

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    It's white distilled vinegar you want, some Tescos do stock it but some don't.
    If you have a newborn in the house I would deal with this problem quickly, mold spores can be very harmful when breathed in, especially with asthma sufferers.
    The size of the dehumidifier will depend on room size and quickness you wish to complete the job, the manufacturers instruction will offer guideline on usage.
     
  8. JohnD

    JohnD

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    bleach in water will kill the mould and mildew and IMO not smell so long as vinegar. If you are sponging it you can add a drop of washing up liquid to help it wet the surface. Once the mildew is dead it will clean off more easily.

    But mould and damp will keep coming back if you drape wet washing about the house. It is a terrible source of condensation.

    If your bathroom has an extractor fan, leave the fan running continuously and dry your washing in there. Some people like to put a washing line over the bath so it can drip safely.

    http://www.diynot.com/wiki/building:condensation_in_houses

    p.s. rather than spend your money on a dehumidifier, consider a new drier. It is vital to get a vented one with a big hose that goes through the wall (all vented driers let some steam into the house, some more than others). If you do not already have a suitable hole in the wall, your local hire shop can supply a 105mm Core Drill which will go through a brick wall quite easily and make a very neat round hole. When I hired one, I did holes for tumble drier, extractor fan, utility room vent all in half a day.

    p.p.s. Tumble driers are quite expensive to run (in the region of 25p-30p per hour) so unless you are quite prosperous you might like to think about a washing line outside, possible under cover of something like a car port or garden shelter. That will save you money, especially in dry weather.
     
  9. CortinaV8

    CortinaV8

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    Lifeskills 101 :LOL:
     
  10. AndyDavis

    AndyDavis

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    Thanks for all the good advice. A washing line would be perfect but sadly we're on a 2nd floor flat so its not an option. And its a condensing dryer because theres not a hole in the wall, but the kitchen window stays open when its on, and working. But you're right the real problem is the kiddie bits drying in the house.

    Thanks again.
     
  11. DIYnot Local

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