UPVC between dormer window frames and soffits

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I arrived home this week to find my builder had fitted out the rear dormer bathroom windows and Juliet balcony windows, BUT also added extra UPVC all the way up from the windows frames to the soffits which I think looks rather ugly. The left picture shows expected design from the final drawings (dormer tiles above window frames, just like my neighbours on both sides have) and right shows the UPVC that's been installed between all windows and soffits above. The builder's defence is two-fold:

1. "This is a design and build contract; we build to our normal practices."
2. "We do it like this because otherwise in high winds dormer tiles can blow off above the windows and Juliet doors, and if that happened after reverting to your preferred options of tiles only, you would not be covered by our warranty."

So two questions here:
1. Although it is indeed a Design and Build contract the scope of works actually states "New small plain concrete tiles to the dormer face and cheeks" - so nothing explicit about UPVC to the dormer face (excluding of course the actual window frames)
2. Is it true that in high winds tiles are more likely to blow off above dormer windows and Juliet balcony doors?

Thanks guys!
 

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Why would you do a domestic extension with a D&B contract? Have your neighbours tiles ever blown off, he's been a cheapskate.
 
I arrived home this week to find my builder had fitted out the rear dormer bathroom windows and Juliet balcony windows, BUT also added extra UPVC all the way up from the windows frames to the soffits which I think looks rather ugly. The left picture shows expected design from the final drawings (dormer tiles above window frames, just like my neighbours on both sides have) and right shows the UPVC that's been installed between all windows and soffits above. The builder's defence is two-fold:

1. "This is a design and build contract; we build to our normal practices."
2. "We do it like this because otherwise in high winds dormer tiles can blow off above the windows and Juliet doors, and if that happened after reverting to your preferred options of tiles only, you would not be covered by our warranty."

So two questions here:
1. Although it is indeed a Design and Build contract the scope of works actually states "New small plain concrete tiles to the dormer face and cheeks" - so nothing explicit about UPVC to the dormer face (excluding of course the actual window frames)
2. Is it true that in high winds tiles are more likely to blow off above dormer windows and Juliet balcony doors?

Thanks guys!
He should have made provision for a short course (beneath the lead) all the way across the whole extension, in that case. The lead would have need to travel the whole rear too. Too late now, unless he dismantles the soffit, fascia etc.

How is he going to fix the JB?
 
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Thanks noseall. The soffit will now be dismantled, and lead put all around. What does JB stand for, Juliet Balcony?
 
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Are you actually questioning the fact that is not clad in tiles, or the bit of white plastic above the frames?

A D&B contract is not a "do what you like" contract unless that is what you you have agreed. Normally a design is agreed and that is what is expected to be built. Variations to a design must be approved and there may be cost variations too.

Is planning permission involved?

What is the impact on building regulations - fire safety?
 
Thanks ^woody^. I'm questioning the white plastic above the frames where I expected tiles to be (per drawings).
This is Permitted Development, so all the more reason to match the existing outward facing materials (tiles) I would have thought, and restrict UPVC to just glass panel frames and soffits/fascias.
 
Apologies I was looking at the images on my phone and it looked like the builder had swapped the drawing tile cladding for brown shiplap cladding and I thought that was one of your concerns, but it is in fact just the heads of the frames that are the issue.

IMO, it's just a matter of design whether the heads of the frames are matched to the frame or matched to the adjacent cladding. Either are correct.

If the heads are clad like in the design, then that will make the whole dormer look taller and the roof higher. I think it looks better like that compared to the drawing.
Bear in mind whoever drew that up has not really thought of the design, he'd just drawn the rectangle, put the roof on, which is at a set height and then just hatched" the front with a [unrealistic] tile pattern he happened to have on file to fill the area - including between the frame and soffit.

This wont affect PD in terms of matching the existing.

I'm now not sure if this minor alteration is in fact that much of a big contract issue to have required your consent.
 
I'd say it's an improvement over the drawing, which was probably drawn by someone who didn't even think about how you'd get a row or two of tiles to dangle precariously over it.

It would probably be less hassle for potential future maintenance if left as it's been built. The builder should have discussed the reasons for the change from the drawing, but don't let principles about who's right or wrong get in the way of doing it in the best way.

If it's all adequately stuck together and insulated then it should be fine.

Just enjoy your new room and don't care about it, you probably won't ever look at it anyway, and shouldn't really care if you do.
 
What does JB stand for, Juliet Balcony?
Yes.

The fixing of any JB is important and specific and will be inspected by the BCO. If your builder hasn't made provision for it ( left some fixing arrangement protruding through the tile hanging), then he will likely have to remove the tiles locally, in any case.
 
I'd say it's an improvement over the drawing
Me too.




was probably drawn by someone who didn't even think about how you'd get a row or two of tiles to dangle precariously over it.
You would add a kicker batten (bottom of the tile) and a regular hanging batten, and fix the tiles to it. The lead would then dress down over most of the tile.

Visually, you could probably achieve the same , if you just dressed the lead down over a piece of wood fitted down to the kicker batten. There simply isn't the room to show much tile because it will be concealed with the lead.

Thanks ^woody^. I'm questioning the white plastic above the frames where I expected tiles to be (per drawings).
This is Permitted Development, so all the more reason to match the existing outward facing materials (tiles) I would have thought, and restrict UPVC to just glass panel frames and soffits/fascias.
Read my post above.
 

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