Using a MI Tower

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I practiced using this today. Is it a case of always climbing up on the inside, locking wheels (which are level), using the stabilizers? Gonna use it on three jobs- scraping grass off a valley on a roof near chimney then to lower the guttering so water flows better into downpipe somewhere else.

4 metres. Working height 6 metres

Is it ok to use on grass or should I put wood underneath wheels?


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Yes to the bits of wood on the grass.
Yes to climbing ONLY inside.
Always have someone nearby
That picture of the built tower looks to have no handrails.
I wouldn't use it like that
 
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Is it a case of always climbing up on the inside, locking wheels (which are level), using the stabilizers?
An emphatic YES - always climb up.on the inside of a tower.

With such a small tower I'd always use the stabilisers unless you are only working at 1m or so above ground.

Stabilisers must always be at 45° to the corner of the tower unless a tower is flat against a wall in which case the stabilisers nearest the wall must be parallel to it

Wheels must always be locked when the tower is in use

Watch that you don't overload the tower. Towers have a specified loading capacity for the operative, materials and tools
Always have someone nearby
And ideally wear appropriate working at height head protection (a hard hat with padding inside and a chin strap)
That picture of the built tower looks to have no handrails.
I wouldn't use it like that
It is also missing brickboards and should it have diagonal bracing? (most towers do, not familiar with this make - we tend to use much larger 2-man towers). When used on soft or irregular surfaces not only should spreader boards be utilised beneath the feet AND the outriggers, and but on all the towers I've used ithe castor feet must be removed and replaced by flat plate feet - that's also what you get told on scaff tower safety courses
 
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Yes to the bits of wood on the grass.
Yes to climbing ONLY inside.
Always have someone nearby
That picture of the built tower looks to have no handrails.
I wouldn't use it like that

Not sure there are handrails on the MI Tower. I didnt read it in instructions I dont think. Are they to climb up on. Theres a toe board for it though

I wasn't given any flat plate feet so dont know. Am using it on grass so will check
 
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An emphatic YES - always climb up.on the inside of a tower.

With such a small tower I'd always use the stabilisers unless you are only working at 1m or so above ground.

Stabilisers must always be at 45° to the corner of the tower unless a tower is flat against a wall in which case the stabilisers nearest the wall must be parallel to it

Wheels must always be locked when the tower is in use

Watch that you don't overload the tower. Towers have a specified loading capacity for the operative, materials and tools

And ideally wear appropriate working at height head protection (a hard hat with padding inside and a chin strap)

It is also missing brickboards and should it have diagonal bracing? (most towers do, not familiar with this make - we tend to use much larger 2-man towers). When used on soft or irregular surfaces not only should spreader boards be utilised beneath the feet AND the outriggers, and but on all the towers I've used ithe castor feet must be removed and replaced by flat plate feet - that's also what you get told on scaff tower safety courses
I'm not sure what a brick board is

Surely outriggers are better dug into grass so dont move not on wood
 
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I'm not sure what a brick board is
Brick board = toe board. Same thing. Maybe not so important if you are working alone, but start working with others, or in public areas, and having something fitted which helps prevent tools, materials, waste material being kicked off the platform - and potentially damaging other things or even causing injury to people
Surely outriggers are better dug into grass so dont move not on wood
It depends on what is under the grass. The outriggers are primarily there to prevent the tower from over balancing, not to stop it moving (that is the function of the wheel brakes, or better if outdoors, flat feet). If positioned on a board on soft ground, especially if the board is staked to the ground to prevent it moving, the load on the outrigger is spread over a larger area, making less likely to sink in if overloaded. A small contact pad, as you get with an outrigger end, is far more prone to sinking into the ground if it is overloaded. Same principle that mobile cranes use
 
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those spreader timbers might crack under load, when the ground sinks under the weight? also dont forget the timbers under the outriggers.
 
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Used it on a house today. The instructions stated two thirds of tower must be next to building. It's not (just half) so fixed a strong fixing to wall and tied the top of tower. Hope this is sufficient. One of outriggers was not exactly 45 degrees due to Bush. The other two parallel with wall. May have put one or two braces in wrong place not sure


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Yes. We use scaffolding planks, doubled up and screwed together if needs be

Are they not too narrow? What if the wheels slides off. Wouldnt a big piece of ply for whole thing be better? I tried scaffold planks and but the wheels yesterday on your advice but seemed to go too close to edge. Also do you use spirit level too to check platform when assembling?
 
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Are they not too narrow? What if the wheels slides off. Wouldnt a big piece of ply for whole thing be better?
We don't use wheels when working on sloping ground, soft ground, in stair wells (although that requires a special type of scaffolding tower), etc - only fixed feet - because all our towers have to be inspected and tagged off by a PASMA trained person (in our firm that's normally me or one of the other site supervisors as few of our operatives have the appropriate ticket) - and PASMA (and forvthat matter the HSE) don't sanction the use of wheels in such situations.

To overcome your problem I'd suggest something like 600mm rectangles of 18mm plywood (2 thicknesses screwed together for stiffness) with some form of batten around the edges, maybe 2 x 1 slate lath, or alternatively two pieces of scaff plank side by side and fixed together with a couple of lengths of 2 x 2 or 3 x 2 softwood and screws

Also do you use spirit level too to check platform when assembling?
Yes, but just a small torpedo level. No need to go overboard
 
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