Wall, floor Insulation and other materials

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I have read a few recent house fire stories and was thinking that in case of a fire the timbers (joists, rafters) and the insulation in between would burn and produce toxic fumes.

The timbers are C24 and sprayed with some sort of chemical pesticide. I am not sure how this burns and what gasses it releases. The insulation is a PRI polyisocyanurate and when it burns, again, I am not sure what gasses it releases.

In addition, the carpenter wants to use EGGER Protect chipboard and Joint & Joist Adhesive (as opposed to plywood and screws), and when it burns it will also release gasses?

Am I being paranoid?
 
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On the timber: Yes, the risk there is very low so I wouldn't worry any more. The smoke isn't good for you but it isn't going to make much difference over normal smoke inhalation in a fire.

On the PIR, it isn't as clear cut. Building regs say it's ok to use in smaller buildings like conventional houses. If it catches fire it will burn very well and give off nasty fumes. But if your insulation is in the normal places you should have plenty of time, and other smoke to set off fire alarms and allow you to escape, before it catches light.

At least some people on here have strong opinions on this, especially after Grenfell. @^woody^ might want to weigh in.
 
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If you think about it, the house you live in is a death-trap. The carpets, the furniture, the clothes in the wardrobe as well as the wardrobe, the sheets on your bed, the kitchen units, the wall paper or emulsion on the wall next to the curtains never mind the floor boards, the floor, ceiling and roof etc. It all burns, and it all burns fast and well and the smoke will choke you long before you have to worry about the fire roasting you. And that's without or before any PIR hidden in the structure behind 30 minutes of fire proofing.

My tip would be not to be in the house to breathe any fumes whilst it's burning.
 
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The key thing in house fires is escape, and the key thing regarding escape is early warning. My advice is make sure your smoke 'tectors are good ones and working properly.
 
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Yes, I have introduced in the plans a new fire escape for the 1st floor, a new door at the gable, over the flat roof laundry below! Open the door, simply walk over the laundry flat roof almost same level as floor inside. My wife does not believe it is at all necessary, and she says "show me another house with a fire door at 1st floor". It will cost something extra but if you wake up in the middle of the night and it's on fire and you cannot go downstairs at least there is an exit.
 
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I have read a few recent house fire stories and was thinking that in case of a fire the timbers (joists, rafters) and the insulation in between would burn and produce toxic fumes.
What ever is on fire inside a home will produce toxic gasses, lol.:rolleyes:
 
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Yes, I have introduced in the plans a new fire escape for the 1st floor, a new door at the gable, over the flat roof laundry below! Open the door, simply walk over the laundry flat roof almost same level as floor inside. My wife does not believe it is at all necessary, and she says "show me another house with a fire door at 1st floor". It will cost something extra but if you wake up in the middle of the night and it's on fire and you cannot go downstairs at least there is an exit.
If i wake in the middle of the night with a raging fire downstairs bad enough I can’t go down i’m not sure i’d want to be walking over a flat roof over a laundry room.
 
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We have an escape ladder which you hook over the window cill and you simply climb down to ground level.
First thing any householder/tenant should do is to draw up an escape plan and make sure every member of the family understands it and what they must do if it becomes necessary to evacuate the building.
How many of you look at the fire escape plan, and if you do, how many of you 'walk' the fire escape route if you stay in a hotel/guest house?
Not may I bet.
 
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How many of you look at the fire escape plan, and if you do, how many of you 'walk' the fire escape route if you stay in a hotel/guest house?
I'll either be elsewhere or lying in bed pished out of my mind not really thinking about walking anywhere :confused:
 
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Do you have a way of getting down from the laundry roof if you ever have to use it? Does the roof have fencing/barriers around it to prevent people from falling, (especially if it could be used as a sun bathing area in summer)? Fire exits have to comply with certain regulations, e.g. they have to be fireproof for a certain length of time, they must not open to an area where other dangers may occur, they must be free from obstruction at all times etc. You need to take advice before simply installing a door in such a position. I like your idea of an alternative escape route but it must be planned properly but I don't think it's the SE's decision, more like BC or Planning.
 
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I have already thought the 36m2 area would make a nice balcony, it will be ~3m over ground, I can install a staircase leading up to it or just a ladder.

There was this recent fire where there is a flat roof garage on the side which looks completely unharmed. Had there been an escape door on the gable maybe they could have avoided some deaths. https://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/uncle-broke-both-legs-escaping-25499752
 
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You don't normally need additional fire escape on the first floor of a house as long as the stairs lead to a hallway and final exit. Building regs allow for escape via first floor windows as long as the windows comply with escape dimensions.
 
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You'll need planning for a balcony, and I imagine building control would want to know what the support is like for the roof, as I imagine the requirements for a balcony are different to just a flat roof
 
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