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Wearing a body cam

Discussion in 'Trade Talk' started by seasickstevie, 14 Oct 2018.

  1. seasickstevie

    seasickstevie

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    For the first time, I've decided it may be prudent from now on to wear a body camera whilst working in somebody's home.

    After being told in very blunt language that I shouldn't be in a woman's flat 'late in the evening' after being called out by the landlord, on what appeared to be an emergency, her father was on the phone making out, like I'd done something improper.

    Just wondering if anyone else has considered this. Then again, I suppose they're likely to say that they don't agree with recording images. You can't win!
     
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  3. ericmark

    ericmark

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    The main question is should we, or even are we permitted to work alone? Yes I know we all have done it, but if something you are working on breaks, and becomes dangerous, we could need to both go for spares or turn off a supply, and guard the dangerous item so no one is injured.

    The idea that if you are injured the home occupant can call for help, is all well and good when it is the home occupant who has called you out, however when the occupant is not of sound mind, below 18 years old, infirm etc, then one can't really use them as your safety fall back. I know with my mother she could answer door and let tradesmen in, but she was not really able to phone for help, she had a call button but even with that she would not use it she would simply forget it was there.

    So if landlord calls one out, question one is if there is a responsible person on site to let you in and act as safety line. i.e. can use a phone to call for help if required. If the answer is yes, then if that person is not old enough, or not of sound mind, or disabled in a way where they can't call for help, then either the landlord or their agent needs to meet you there, or you need to take some one with you.

    I know the council would send female carers on their own to see my mother, but any male worker always had some one with them, and all the carers had to have the police vetting done.

    As to cameras in the house, no way. I wanted to put a pet cam in house to ensure mother was OK, I had to declare before it was fitted to all the carers that it was there, and it's position was carefully selected to ensure unlikely to take any inappropriate images.

    As to how hard it is to get a licence I don't know, I think they cost £220 for 3 years and
    To get your licence you:
    • must be at least 18 years of age
    • must pass an identity check
    • must pass a criminal record check
    For front line roles you must also hold the appropriate SIA-approved qualification.

    It seems my dash cam is illegal as it has a screen on the back showing what it is recording, also no part of the camera can intrude more than 4 cm into windscreen wiper arc.

    Helmet cams worn by cyclists also have restrictions, you can't film on private property or persistently film one person, that's considered as harassment. I know drones have very strict rules, to use a drone to take a photo of a house which you want to sell, the drone operator has to have a licence, has to complete loads of paperwork, and ask permission from any property which it is likely to capture. Long stick with camera at top is far cheaper, and legal.

    Even when it is your property it can cause court cases I don't know how much it cost Trump to fight the court case, but I know I would not want to pay it.
     
  4. seasickstevie

    seasickstevie

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    A bit intrigued that you dash cam is illegal ! ... maybe that's a typo?
     
  5. tonyVent

    tonyVent

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    if you think you need one to provide future evidence then were one, but think you you need to advise anyone's threshold you are stepping over that you have one and its recording
     
  6. tonyVent

    tonyVent

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    you get cheaper car insurance if you have a dash cam.
     
  7. Iamchamps

    Iamchamps

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    A lot of people will not agree to that and could see it losing you a lot of business. If you tried to do it in secret and it was spotted it would be even worse.
     
  8. tonyVent

    tonyVent

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    lamcharmps I said advise any customer that you have cam running for their protection as well as theirs.
     
  9. opps

    opps

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    I think you just need to find better clients...

    Luckily, I am recommended to my customers and have never had to work for anyone that doesn't know (of) me.

    I would however feel uncomfortable if a tradesman turned up with a bodycam- my gut response would be that they have been accused of something or other previously- it's one of those mud sticks/no smoke without fire moments.

    If however, you pitched it as "I will set up a video cam so that you can see me working", you may find that clients will be more amenable to the idea.
     
    Last edited: 17 Oct 2018
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  11. tonyVent

    tonyVent

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    thats a good idea oops, might have some legs. The customer can see what they are spending their money on.
     
  12. seasickstevie

    seasickstevie

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    I think opps has put it well, that's probably the only way it could work. Although in reality, under normal situations, it's probably too much hassle remembering to set up a camera as soon as you get to a job ... then what happens after you disappear out of shot, or the mic doesn't pick up what's said when you've gone into another room etc.

    All a bit extreme I think, although it was me that posed the question in the first place. It was just that after being called out last Sunday evening by the landlord because the electrics had tripped twice (although had since been reset), the (adult female) tenant, who was in the house with two other adults (one an adult male), informs her father by phone that an electrician has arrived, he then tells her to hand the phone to me, and starts berating me for being in his daughter's home after 9pm! ........ He even then informs me that he's an electrician himself! ... and then turns it around, and wants to know if I'll be carrying out other (trivial) repairs whilst I'm there?

    He didn't want me in his daughter's place, but then starts listing things he wants fixing on a Sunday night before I go! It takes all sorts ...

    I didn't hang around for long.
     
  13. Notch7

    Notch7

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    I wouldve just said:

    'Thank you sir thats fine, I will leave now, I am sure there are plenty of lady electricians that will come out on a a Sunday evening. Please could somebody sign to say you have refused to let me carry out any work (so I can charge your landlord for the call out fee).'
     
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  14. Newboy

    Newboy

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    Sadly I'm with you. We used to manage a large residential block on behalf of the freeholder. A couple of the leasehold flats were owned by buy-to-let landlords who ended up with young single female tenants one of whom threatened one of our guys with alleging that he had made 'advances to her' as retribution for asking her to desist from cluttering up a communal area (and fire escape route). After that any of us who worked in the property wore a small bodycam with a CCTV badge and all leaseholders/tenants were notified in writing that this system was in use. This approach was cleared by the ICO (we already had registered).

    Sad sign of the times but the alternative of somebody being accused of inappropriate behaviour doesn't look like a lot of fun.

    On the dashcam subject. For no reason that I could fathom, other than the PC being an ar*e, I got pulled in the early hours (on the way back from a call out) and accused of running a red light. I stated that it was green and was told that it was my word against his. I stated that I would be rejecting the fixed penalty notice and opting for an appearance in the magistrates court where I would be pleading not guilty. PC seemed surprised and a little confused. I explained that I'm sure the footage from the dashcam would clear the matter up for the magistrates. No ticket issued and nothing more heard.
     
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  15. securespark

    securespark

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    They are total bastards. How they get away with this kind of ****, I do not know.
     
  16. mattylad

    mattylad

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    The single female tenants of police officers? the description can fit both lol.

    There are many videos on youtube of similar police interactions, many do not appear to know the law or want to obey and use correctly it themselves.
     
  17. securespark

    securespark

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    Police!

    If they are not trained properly, the Chief ought to know and if they are just behaving bady then the Chief ought to know....
    If I was Chief, I would want to watch these types of vids on YT to see what my officers are doing and I would call all those officers involved in for an explanation.
    As this hasn't happened (I assume, as many officers are still working outside their remits), this suggests the superiors don't care, which is doubly shocking.
     
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