1. Visiting from the US? Why not try DIYnot.US instead? Click here to continue to DIYnot.US.
    Dismiss Notice

What is this black shiny rocky stuff kitchen floor?

Discussion in 'Floors, Stairs and Lofts' started by diycider, 21 Sep 2019.

Tags:
  1. diycider

    diycider

    Joined:
    16 Feb 2015
    Messages:
    15
    Thanks Received:
    0
    Location:
    Cheshire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    I am taking up our kitchen floor. It has big flags down layed on cement. I found out part of the floor underneath is concrete, part is boarded, then there is an area struggling to take the cement up. It's not coming up well and I'm not hitting a floor. I've hit this black stuff? It looks like shiny charcoal and smells like it but I know it isnt. Does anybody know what it is and if there should be a floor underneath it?

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Cheers
     
  2. Sponsored Links
  3. Keithmac

    Keithmac

    Joined:
    10 Oct 2017
    Messages:
    1,578
    Thanks Received:
    249
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Damp proofing?.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  4. is it soft or brittle?
     
  5. Tigercubrider

    Tigercubrider

    Joined:
    22 Jul 2016
    Messages:
    3,537
    Thanks Received:
    555
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Looks like bitumen - the dpc.
     
  6. Sponsored Links
  7. bobasd

    bobasd

    Joined:
    2 Dec 2017
    Messages:
    2,373
    Thanks Received:
    452
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    could be, as above, bitumen or a thin layer of asphalt. it could have served as a DPM aka a Membrane.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  8. JobAndKnock

    JobAndKnock

    Joined:
    30 Sep 2011
    Messages:
    4,438
    Thanks Received:
    928
    Location:
    Lancashire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    I'm with Bob on this one. I reckon it's asphalt which is laid hot and sets like rock (which after all is what it is). I've seen it laid over old uneven flooring many times at 3/4 to 2 in thickness. As said it is waterproof and highly durable. It can take a heavy (5 to 10 kg) breaker or even a road breaker to smash it out in a reasonable amount of time. You may be able to do it with a rotation stop SDS drill if its thin enough, but it'll probably take quite some time. Not really a job to do with a club hammer and bolster chisel, though
     
  9. cdbe

    cdbe

    Joined:
    22 Nov 2009
    Messages:
    803
    Thanks Received:
    126
    Location:
    Oldham
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    It's in a lot of old terraced houses round our way - usually on top of thick stone flags - levels and forms DPM. Unless it's too high try and leave it in. To get it up, if you can get something under (flat chisel) to lift it up a bit it's very brittle and breaks easily with a big hammer - the ones I've done it hasn't actually stuck to what's underneath.
     
  10. diycider

    diycider

    Joined:
    16 Feb 2015
    Messages:
    15
    Thanks Received:
    0
    Location:
    Cheshire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Thanks all, I didn't get an email notification that people had responded! I had a friend look who is in the trade and said why am I that low haha. He says it is membrane/damp proof.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  11. DIYnot Local

    DIYnot Local

    Joined:
    3 Sep 2019
    Country:
    United Kingdom

    If you need to find a tradesperson to get your job done, please try our local search below, or if you are doing it yourself you can find suppliers local to you.

    Select the supplier or trade you require, enter your location to begin your search.


    Are you a trade or supplier? You can create your listing free at DIYnot Local

     
Loading...

Share This Page