What to consider when laying laminate flooring for 1st time?

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Hi everyone.

I am considering having a go at laying laminate flooring (probably wooden laminate) for the first time in my hall way and dining room (same flooring all the way through both rooms) and wondered if anyone could give me some tips please?

It is a 1930's house, so I have a bay window and fire place in the dining room, and the stairs in the hall to negotiate.
Also as the original skirting is on and we have had all the walls replastered before we moved in so I am not planning to remove them to lay the flooring.

The things I am concerned about are:

1. How much flooring should I buy? i.e. how much over the measured size of 21.25 sq. metres?
2. What kind of underlay is best to use over the existing floorboards (dining room) and wood flooring (hall)?
3. Where abouts should I start laying the flooring? i.e. hall (strairs side or flat wall) or dining room (fire place side or flat wall)
4. What is the best option for edging the flooring up to the skirting boards
5. Do I need to leave a set gap for seasonal expansion etc?

Any other advice on things to consider or be aware of would be greatly appreciated.

Many thanks :D
 
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Hi Matthanddon

wood laminate is better called Wood-Engineered, to prevent confusion with the 'plastic' Melamine laminated flooring ;)

1) rule of thumb: add 5 - 7% extra for saw-waste, then calculate that up to the next full pack
2) if all underfloors are reasonably level 2 - 3 foam underlayment is fine. don't put any combine products (which included a DPM) down
3) what you think would be the easiest and straightest wall
4) we use flat (solid) beading, this is pinned to the floor and covers the expansion gap.
5) rule of thumb: wood-engineered minimum of 10mm (on all sides); solids: 3mm per linear meter width. e.g. room 4 meters wide = minimum of 12mm

We also recommend using thresholds in doorways, even when you plan to install the same flooring in connecting rooms: some rooms have a different climate and could react different to humidity and temperature (e.g. hallways versus living room with central heating on). A threshold also enables you to keep the expansion gap everywhere.

Have fun
 
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Hi WoodYuoLike, did you really mean you pin the flat bead to the "floor", surely it should be to the skirting so the floor can move freely under the bead
 
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Hi WoodYuoLike, did you really mean you pin the flat bead to the "floor", surely it should be to the skirting so the floor can move freely under the bead
 
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3) Also you generally start from the left.

Another point is that you want to try and have the boards in line with the window or light source. In other words the short edge of the board is parallel with the light source. This minimises any shadows. This also is the case in long hallways.
 
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confused 2 said:
Hi WoodYuoLike, did you really mean you pin the flat bead to the "floor", surely it should be to the skirting so the floor can move freely under the bead

It very hard to pin a 5mm flat beading to the skirting ;) I think you confuse it with scotia.
No, it's correct, pin the beading to the wooden floor (thin pin). If there is any movement, but with wood-engineered you wont have that much movement, the beading will move with the floor (also a 'warning system' for movement).

We have been using flat beading for years and more and more U.K. suppliers stock it because of the increase in demand, so we don't have to get in from NL any longer.
 
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HandyJon said:
3) Also you generally start from the left.

Depends on the way the T&G is constructed, cause there isn't really an universal standard. Sometimes it's not possible to start from the left
 
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HI

If the laminate you are laying down , is the click and fix stuff
try my easy way to lay it

instead of following the instruction which say lay one board at a time and connect both the front and side of each plank as you go (spent many hours clicking getting one end of the line to click in for the other to pop out )

i found it easier to connect one whole line boards together first
then line them up to previous line of boards
click them in so the whole line is pointing up at the desired click in angle
referr to the instructions for this

then take your shoes off and slowly walk down the line of boards
slowly pushin them down and clicking them in place as you go
 
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Ignoring instructions from manufacturers can result in losing the guarantee, just as long as are are aware of this.
 
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WoodYouLike said:
Ignoring instructions from manufacturers can result in losing the guarantee, just as long as are are aware of this.

A bit of an extreme statement! Worse that can happen with click style laminate is that some of the boards get their T&G damaged a bit. You quickly learn to try something else. I've even installed some laminate flooring by sliding it along the long T&G when there hasn't been much space to fit it the normal method.
 
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HandyJon said:
WoodYouLike said:
Ignoring instructions from manufacturers can result in losing the guarantee, just as long as are are aware of this.

A bit of an extreme statement!

Sorry, but it's not extreem, it's reality I'm afraid.
 
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Thanks for all the advice folks, I am starting to get a bit more confident about having a go at laying the flooring myself.

We have seen a couple of styles of the Kahrs 'Wood Engineered' flooring (thanks Woodyoulike ;) ) we like, does anyone have any experience (good or bad) of laying this flooring.
Also how hard wearing is it?

Thanks again for taking the time to respond and help out a novice!!! :D
 
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matthaddon said:
Thanks for all the advice folks, I am starting to get a bit more confident about having a go at laying the flooring myself.

We have seen a couple of styles of the Kahrs 'Wood Engineered' flooring (thanks Woodyoulike ;) ) we like, does anyone have any experience (good or bad) of laying this flooring.
Also how hard wearing is it?

Kars is as good as any other well known brand (Karelia, Takett, Haro etc, etc), nowadays there is hardly any quality difference between them. We have lots of experiences with various Wood-Engineered brands, mostly good (only bad experience we had was when one of our suppliers had changed his range to the 'cheaper' range: typical 'banana-shaped' boards, which are a pain to install properly without gaps).
 
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I have a 100+ year old victorian house and have just finished laying Oak engineered flooring in my hallway. I used a 3mm underlay that I bought in rolls.

I did follow all the manufacturers instructions, but they were a bit vague when it came to dealing with doorways and pipes etc,

Although the tips are intended to help when laying laminate, the principles are the same.

I'd definately recommend engineered flooring over real wood or laminate, it was easy to install and looks amazing :)

Oh, and I started laying from the left ;)
 
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Hey guys,

Where did you get your laminate?

Me and my wife have oak wood flooring in our home. When I was buying it I was suggest to go against laminate. My home is from 1940s...

So let me know how laminate worked out for you. We still need to overhaul the top floor and would consider laminate all over if it shows as a good solution. We have been recommended http://galacroftfloors.co.uk/ by our close friend. Hope we are the same luck as him
 

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