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Which router bits for 18v makita

Discussion in 'Tools and Materials' started by littlecookie, 21 Apr 2019.

  1. littlecookie

    littlecookie

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    Just bought the 18v makita trimmer/router, normally use chisels but decided to go the trend jig and router route ..

    Which router bit works best for hinges and for mortices size wise etc
    ..cheers
     
  2. blup

    blup

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    Specialist router bits are available from Trend, Wealden and others.

    I prefer using straight bits for housings, although wider hinge bits are available to fit the width of a standard hinge.

    For mortising, you will be limited (depth wise) in choice by the smaller collet of the 18 volt Makita (3/8 max IIRC).

    You will get good advice and a speedy service from Wealden:

    https://www.wealdentool.com/acatalog/Straight_2.html

    Blup
     
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  3. littlecookie

    littlecookie

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    Do you free hand for hinges or always use the jig
     
  4. blup

    blup

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    If a beginner I would recommend using a jig.

    You can see that it can be done freehand from this guy, practice would make perfect



    ….at about 3.40

    Blup
     
  5. littlecookie

    littlecookie

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    What size bit would you use
     
  6. JobAndKnock

    JobAndKnock

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    If you use the Trend jig you'll need either a 16mm guide bush and a 12mm diameter cutter or a 16.7mm guide bush and a 12.7mm (1/2in) diameter cutter. Trend sell guide bushings in both these sizes to fit the Porter-Cable (generic American) router - these guide bushes also fit the fixed base directly, or the plunge base by using a guide bush adaptor (made by Makita and others). The big plus of using the 16.7/12.7mm combination is that you can get a hinge recessing bit in 12.7mm size (they are rarely available in 12mm diameter for some reason). These bits cut faster and clear waste more efficiently than conventional straight 2-flute cutters but aren't designed for plunge cutting, so you need to feed in from the side, not really a problem when hinge recessing.
    Wealden Hinge Mortising Cutter 001_01.gif
    Above: Hinge recessing cutter
    Below: US-style (Porter-Cable) guide bush

    Trend US-style Guide Bush 001_01.JPG
    Note that the guide bushes above are NOT the traditional Trend pressed steel style, so guide bushes for the Elu MOF96/deWalt DW615/Trend T5-type routers are not the same.

    TBH you don't need to use a jig - set-out the hinge positions on a rod from the door casing (with a 3mm packer at the top between the head and the rod), transfer the settings to the door then mark-out conventionally with a combi square and knife. A trim router can then be used to hog-away the majority of the waste freehand using a 2-flute straight cutter (8 to 16mm diameter). The remaining waste is then removed using a sharp chisel and a hammer or mallet. I have the Trend jig, but unless I'm doing half a dozen (or more) identical doors the hog-it and chisel-it solution works just fine. Jigs only save time if you are doing multiples
     
    Last edited: 21 Apr 2019
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  7. littlecookie

    littlecookie

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    I only do domestic and find the old casings on most occasions have different hinge sizes/ spaces already cut into them ,so I've bought the jig but from what I see il av to set it up different for each door ..think il have a go ar free hand
     
  8. JobAndKnock

    JobAndKnock

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    Well, it ain't rocket science - all it takes is some decent (accurate) setting-out (hence use a rod) and a bit of care doing the routing and the chisel work. I even had one first year apprentice who could do it well (although granted he was one of the better ones!). The jigs are all very well but they don't work at all well when trying to transfer set-out from an existing door frame/casing to a new door, I've found - they are good if you are installing all new doors and frames/casings, but for the new install stuff I work on these days that all comes pre-hung making jigs superfluous
     
    Last edited: 24 Apr 2019
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