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Which staple and hasp?

Discussion in 'General DIY' started by EddyP, 16 Jun 2015.

  1. EddyP

    EddyP

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    We've recently moved and as a result a lot of my garage stuff is in an outbuilding until the garage is sorted.
    I'd like to up the security of it so want a really heavy duty, almost angle grinder proof staple and hasp to fit to the door. I've already fitted some hinge bolts, but now the other side needs improving.

    All of the sort I find seem to be quite easy to attack with an angle grinder, does anyone know of anything better or one that they'd suggest is pretty damn strong?

    Thanks
     
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  3. footprints

    footprints

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  4. JohnD

    JohnD

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    I have a couple of enormous Ingersoll ones off warehouse gates, similar to a Chubb 7009 padbar, might part with one, but post would be expensive. Where are you?
     
  5. big-all

    big-all

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    what is the outbuilding made from
    they may just go through the wall if its a shed type building
     
  6. Belboz

    Belboz

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    Big-all is correct. If the thieving scum want to get in, they will choose the path of least resistance. On a shed, the hasp and staple can be substantial but if fixed into thin(nish) wood, they will just force the fitting off. If your valuables are covered by insurance, worth checking the small print and acting accordingly. FWIW, as has been said, a decent mortice is sometimes a better way to go or, alternatively, a good rim lock with a beefed up internal fixing point. That way, the only external clue is the keyhole.
     
  7. EddyP

    EddyP

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    Thanks all.

    I've already spoken to the insurance company and they're OK with a normal staple and hasp, I just wanted to make it a bit better for my own piece of mind.
    Thanks for the kind offer John, I'm quite far away from you though, so will just go with the strongest I can get locally.

    Think I'll just go with the strongest one at screwfix or Toolstation and get it done. It's not really a shed, more of an old stable, but still wood construction. The door itself is an old stable door with a proper frame so at least thats strong enough to get some coach bolts through.

    The previous people didn't really secure things too well, for example you could lock the bolt on the stable door, but still open the top half, or you might only need a posidrive screwdriver to open everything anyway!!

    The house was even worse, they trusted one pretty old crappy, bent bolt on the back door, then it had a rim lock, we asked the previous owners for the key for this, they said they hadn't locked it in 19 years!
    Think it must be a fairly safe area!
     
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