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Discussion in 'Floors, Stairs and Lofts' started by dogfonos, 29 Jul 2018.

  1. dogfonos

    dogfonos

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    I'd really appreciate advice/guidance on a flooring issue I have...

    New vinyl flooring is to be laid on the kitchen floor (either sheet or LVT, still to be decided). Problem is, the sub floor isn't good enough. The current surface is quarry tiles > concrete > hardcore > earth without any DPC (1950's property). There are high spots, low spots and a few areas that sound hollow when tapped but it seems perfectly dry - though I'd like this checked with a hygrometer - who would do that?

    I'd like a belt-and-braces solution which I suspect will involve digging up the entire floor and re-screeding the lot (even though a new kitchen has already been installed!!) though I'm tempted just to dig up the hollow-sounding tiles, re-screed those areas and leave the rest of the tiles in place. What tradesperson is best to give advice on the prep required and who would normally do this work - flooring expert or builder?

    Also, is it advisable to lay decent quality sheet vinyl in moderately sized rooms? I've recently been scared off laying sheet vinyl in a 25ft x 12ft kitchen diner on advice from a reputable floorlayer. They advised LVT instead - less chance of tearing.
     
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  3. dazlight

    dazlight

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    1st thing you need to decide on if you are going to put a new sub floor down or not.
    Best practise is to but a new screed in with dpm and insulation.

    If you aren’t then you can go over the tiles if they are bonded well.
    You can screed over it with Ardex Na then apply a liquid dpm called Ardex DPM1c then another screed of NA
     
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  4. dazlight

    dazlight

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    No point doing a moisture test as you will get a false reading.
    If a subfloor has no dpc / dpm then as t(e floor is breathing you won’t get a correct reading.
     
  5. dogfonos

    dogfonos

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    Thanks for the info.

    Can you give me a rough idea of the total thickness of this combined screed>DPM>screed?

    Parts of the existing floor are not stable so I think it will at least involve digging up some of the floor and re-screeding. I may go against my usual M.O. and not have a belt-and-braces job done because I don't want to have the new kitchen disassembled and removed in order to do it.
     
  6. dazlight

    dazlight

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    A friend of mine has a flooring business Kent way.
    DW design flooring. Knows his stuff if you need to use him.
    Total thickness would be 7mm ish
    All depends how much building up needs doing
     
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  7. dogfonos

    dogfonos

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    Sadly, wrong side of Kent for me (perfect for the Mother-in-law though. I shall bear this in mind if ever she wants a LVT/vinyl floor).

    Understood. An increase in depth up to 10 -12mm would be OK. If necessary, I'd remove high spots first to reduce building up.

    One final question if I may: Is it advisable to avoid laying sheet vinyl (decent quality stuff) in moderately sized rooms? A reputable floorlayer has recently advised me against laying sheet vinyl in a 25ft x 12ft kitchen diner. He suggested LVT instead - less chance of damage. I understand that but surely good quality sheet vinyl should generally be OK? The sheet vinyl I like comes with a 15 year guarantee after all.

    Thanks again for your advice - much appreciated.
     
  8. dazlight

    dazlight

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    Sheet vinyl will be fine if you buy decent gear. Just make sure it’s all glued down.
     
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  9. DIYnot Local

    DIYnot Local

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