Why does the door close better if the screws are loosened?

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Made this functional but not pretty box. Wondering, why the door shut nicely when I loosen the screws?
1551892883223109198389.jpg
 
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Hinges aren't one quite in line and acting against each other would be the obvious answer. Loosening the screw heads allows them to self align.
 
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Hinges out of line and bind , loose screws allows them to align .
 
E

EddieM

Are the hinges rebated? Can't tell from the photo, but if they're not, then loosening the screws would allow the hinge side to separate a bit from the carcass .
 
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Are the hinges rebated? Can't tell from the photo, but if they're not, then loosening the screws would allow the hinge side to separate a bit from the carcass .

No not rebated. It's ply so I didn't want to chop anything out with a chisel
 
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the knuckles [pivot point] needs to be exactly in line in all directions otherwise each hinge will want to pivot[turn] in a different direction
with screws tight take a strait edge and get it exactly flat and level tight to the knuckle on a hinge and iff its not exactly flat and level at both ends thats your problem
 
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the knuckles [pivot point] needs to be exactly in line in all directions otherwise each hinge will want to pivot[turn] in a different direction
with screws tight take a strait edge and get it exactly flat and level tight to the knuckle on a hinge and iff its not exactly flat and level at both ends thats your problem

Maybe do pilot hole to
the knuckles [pivot point] needs to be exactly in line in all directions otherwise each hinge will want to pivot[turn] in a different direction
with screws tight take a strait edge and get it exactly flat and level tight to the knuckle on a hinge and iff its not exactly flat and level at both ends thats your problem
Surely once you've put screw in and hinge is over the edge or not in line it's difficult to correct it?
 
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is the face off the cabinet 100% flat and level
no dip or bump at the center hinge
 
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is the face off the cabinet 100% flat and level
no dip or bump at the center hinge
Think so. I am not worried too much about this box. As long as it's functional just curious for when I do a job which must be done properly
 
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ply isnt ideal because your screw or drill bit is drawn into the end grain and it will tend to delaminate if your not careful
a simple tip
on the carcass fold the hinge back to 90 degrees onto the side
drill a 2mm pilot hole
use possibly no6 screws whatever screw head fits inside the hinge rather than what looks like no8s you have now with heads sticking out ;)
 
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I see two problems here, and I believe big all is correct.

1: you've used screws that are too large

2: you havent recessed the hinges into the wood

Because of 2 it means the hinge must close more than parallel to allow the door to close, but The screw heads sticking out into the gap between the hinges means the hinge can't close more, like it wants to. This introduces a springiness trying to force the door open again

Pictorially(click to enlarge):


IMG_2802.JPG

Top: using recessed screws keeps the gap clear

Upper middle: using too big a screw prevents the hinge from closing up as much as it can

Lower middle: your cabinet door has to close with a bigger gap at the hinge side than the catch side- the hinge must close past the plates being parallel

Bottom: a hinge that is recessed into the wood doesn't have to close as far

--


Loosening the hinge allows it to move, so it can remain more open even when the cabinet door is closed. This means even though the screws would ordinarily be too big for the gap, because the hinge doesn't close up as much, it can accommodate the bigger screws:


IMG_2804.JPG

(Diagrams are all exaggerated to make a point; the tolerances in your case will be more fine)
 

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