Wiring remote switched sockets for Kitchen appliances

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A question on Kitchen appliance sockets

When wiring accessible switches for hidden kitchen appliance sockets into a ring main, does the 'spur' from the DP switch/FCU (on the ring) down to the unswitched socket under the counter count as a spur for purposes of the maximum number of spurs? If so - in that case does the DP switch/FCU count as a 'socket' on the ring main when doing the 'spurs cannot exceed sockets on ring main' calculation?
 
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There is no (longer a) maximum number of spurs nor a genuine reason for it when 'spurs cannot exceed sockets on ring main' was stated.
 
There is no (longer a) maximum number of spurs nor a genuine reason for it when 'spurs cannot exceed sockets on ring main' was stated.
Thanks again for a prompt, succinct and helpful answer!
 
So the below is a perfectly acceptable kitchen ring?

Do the remote switches for the sockets always need to be fused, or can you rely on the fact anything plugged into a single socket should be fused with a max 13A?

sockets.PNG
 
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Do the remote switches for the sockets always need to be fused, or can you rely on the fact anything plugged into a single socket should be fused with a max 13A?
No fuse is necessary when supplying single sockets like in your diagram if the spurs cannot overload their cables, which will be true if 2.5mm^2 cable is used.
If a socket is replaced with a flex outlet, then you must use an FCU with the correct fuse for the appliance.
 
No fuse is necessary when supplying single sockets like in your diagram if the spurs cannot overload their cables, which will be true if 2.5mm^2 cable is used.
If a socket is replaced with a flex outlet, then you must use an FCU with the correct fuse for the appliance.

The fuse is for the cable not the appliance.
 
The fuse is for the cable not the appliance.
To be clear, when supplying an appliance via a FCU + flex outlet, the FCU is doing the job of a fused plug, and should be sized according to the power of the appliance. The fixed cable on the load side of the FCU is also protected by that FCU, but depending on the size of that cable, may be already adequately protected by the OPD in the CU.
 
There is no discrimination if you have a fuse in an FCU feeding a socket outlet and another one in an appliance plug.
Plus, if the fuse in the appliance plug blows and it is inaccessible, that would be inconvenient.
 
To be clear, when supplying an appliance via a FCU + flex outlet, the FCU is doing the job of a fused plug, and should be sized according to the power of the appliance.

To be absolutely clear you are wrong. The fuse is to protect the cable not the appliance which should be internally protected. Appliances are sold all over the world and most of it does not have fused plugs and rely on the MCB or fuse in the CU which in Europe is usually 16 amp.
 
Why are you using a ring?
A ring would be a sound choice if a 4mm radial was unsuitable (e.g. voltage drop, installation method), or dedicated appliance circuits were impractical.
But it's a fair question.
 

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