Wiring size between two consumer units

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Hi, quick question, we are renovating our house, and whilst a full rewire is on the cards, we want to sort the kitchen out first.
My thoughts are partly because of the additional appliances, and the impending rewire. we add a second smaller consumer unit in the kitchen to run everything off so everything from there is new, and once the rewire goes on, then this area will already have been completed.

we will be running the following appliances from the new consumer unit.
1 x american fridge freezer
2 x single ovens
1 x microwave combi oven
1 x 5 zone electric hob
1 x dishwasher
3 x pop up socket systems ( comprising of 3 sockets on each)
1 x extractor fan
12 x spotlights
1 pendant light
2 x double sockets.
1 x bulkhead for outside..

Distance between old and new consumer units roughly 15m

what thickness twin and earth do we use in between the consumers... ( i understand cooker loads vary, so best guess would be great for now)
thanks
Mark
 
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You would be better running the circuits back to the main CU position and replacing it now.

DS
 
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Cheers for the quick replies.. if not using twin earth then what for a dist circuit?

Ideally i would go back to main CU but in theory i would have to replace each ring main for the hole floor (light/sockets/cooker) to do that... as the kitchen sockets are on the main ring main, lights on lighting one etc.... i just thought doing it this way meant i wouldnt have to touch other rings till we did the main rewire....
 
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Why can't you temporarily connect the old circuits to the new consumer unit?

That said, it does seem a fair distance from the kitchen to the mains position, so kind of understand why you want a kitchen consumer unit - typically called a sub main.
 
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Personally I wouldn't use any cross-sectional area of T&E for a distribution circuit.
Singles are probably easier to install, but if 16mm² were adequate, then I think the only other reason for rejecting T+E would be if the CPC was not adequate for the distribution circuit.

Kind Regards, John
 
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It would. However, unless there was some other reason for wanting to use SWA, it would seem a bit OTT to use it just to get an adequate CPC.

Kind Regards, John
The submain is likely to have to be on a 30mA RCD unless it is swa, which is obviously far from ideal.
 
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"likely" might be described as an assumption ... as likely :sneaky:
Sure, but it is the basis on which it's being assumed as 'likely' that I was asked about.

I have several distribution circuits in my (large) house which are run in 16mm² singles, but nothing about the routing of those cables, per se, requires them to be RCD protected. So am I perhaps the exception that proves the 'likely' rule? :)

Kind Regards, John
 
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