Wood Gutter Replacement

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I am getting my wood gutter replaced.
It is a listed building so needs to retain the look so have to replace with wood or something that looks similar.

The neighbours replaced their side with wood (well they cut the whole gutter in half to get "their side".)

I know there is twinplas but I have heard some negative things about it saying it can leak a lot, especially around joints? And it would be connected to wood at the neighbours side and the downpipe at the other end.


Some builders say it is best to replace wood with wood for the best join?
Just want to see if others agree it is best to stick with wood in this scenario?


For those that seem to not know as it seems a few people don't realise it is a thing, wood is still very common in areas of the uk, especially on listed buildings.
 
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Had a guy round today and he was saying Twinplas was better as a join for wood due to the sleeve.

All other roofers so far said get wood if the neighbours is wood as the join will be better.

I know about the half lap connector but I read that water can get into the empty space of the twinplas gutter as it is hollow, and make it look like you have a leak if water runs down the gutter when actually it is your neighbour. I read that is happens more often when connected to a wood gutter? Twinplas > wood

Now more confused what to do.

It is a listed building and the neighbours have wood.

It seems like the better builders say wood and the others say twinplas, maybe as it is easier for them to fit perhaps?

Some builders are just so anti wood gutter and others say it lasts for years if treated and would be a better join to the neighbours wood gutter.
 
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As it's a listed building, have you checked with the local authority that they will accept a non-wood alternative?.

The big problem with all uPVC building materials is the horrible rate of thermal expansion - especially if it is black. This is typically 0.07-0.08mm/degC/m, so a 5m length of guttering between winter (say -5) and summer (say 35 - might get even hotter surface temperature if black) will expand contract 0.08x5x40 = 16mm!! Depending on how joints are made and what allowances are made, this can be a big problem and lead to joint failure.
 
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Apparently it is retaining the look that is the thing. Should look the same.

Another guy came round today and said twinplas again and tried to push that over wood.
 
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Apparently it is retaining the look that is the thing. Should look the same.

Have you actually checked with your local conservation officer? From my understanding if the building is listed you should be safe replacing with like for like materials, but changing timber to uPVC on a listed building? I wouldn't do it without the CO sprinkling holy water on the proposal - you might have to do it twice!!
 
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Have you actually checked with your local conservation officer? From my understanding if the building is listed you should be safe replacing with like for like materials, but changing timber to uPVC on a listed building? I wouldn't do it without the CO sprinkling holy water on the proposal - you might have to do it twice!!

I was told as long as it looks the same as twinplas looks the same but that is what I was told.
Not sure if they couldn't be bothered looking into it but that was what was said in a brief conversation

Twinplas looks identical to wood.
 
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I was told as long as it looks the same as twinplas looks the same but that is what I was told.
Not sure if they couldn't be bothered looking into it but that was what was said in a brief conversation

Twinplas looks identical to wood.

No worries - if they've OK'd it, no problem. As you can tell I prefer traditional materials where possible :D
 
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No worries - if they've OK'd it, no problem. As you can tell I prefer traditional materials where possible :D

I tried to call now to ask someone else, he put me through but the line went to "we are closed"

The person I spoke to a while ago before didn't take much info, I just said grade 2 listed, has a wood gutter can you switch to twinplas as it looks like wood or just wood and they said as long as it "keeps the look", but they didn't do any investigating or anything. I definitely hadn't been put through to a specific department last time either! It was a while ago I spoke to someone as this was before it broke like it is now.

The website for the council has a form but it says they can't answer questions about if planning permission is needed or not so its hard to get a firm answer. It seems you would have to fill out a planning permission enquires form now which seems ridiculous to have a simple answer!

So many roofers are saying twiplas now and trying to avoid wood. Why I don't know, maybe it is that much better or maybe it is just laziness? I really don't know
 
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maybe it is that much better or maybe it is just laziness? I really don't know

It's probably unfamiliarity with wood + the work needed to do a proper job - it'll be more work than just putting up a length or two of plastic. "better" is arguable both ways. uPVC has the benefit it is self-coloured and needs little initial work except just putting it in place, but it does have the disadvantage that it does move about a fair bit with temperature and the colours do fade as it ages - it also can go very brittle over time.
 
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