Adding a light - confirmation of method needed

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I want to add a new light in a cupboard within a room which I intend to connect to the main light circuit via the ceiling rose in the same room and a pull switch inside the cupboard to operate.


I'm happy with wiring this via a new ceiling rose but was thinking of just using a single downlight inside the cupboard and to save having a couple of chocblocks at the fixture is it a normal/acceptable way of wiring for me to run T+E from existing light to new pull switch, connect live in and out of this switch without cutting into the N&E then run the switched live/N&E to the new light position?

Is this an acceptable way to wire?
Cheers
 
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Yes, it is acceptable. Instead of messing around trying to avoid cutting the neutral it is imo easier to use a piece of terminal block in the back of the switch enclosure.
The earth will need cutting anyway to sleeve it however there is usually a screw in the back box for it to be connected to.
Another option would be to source a double pole switch which has 4 terminals, 2 for L and 2 for N.
 
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Thanks for reply, double pole switch looks like a good idea.

Just wasn't sure if it was common to wire like this and was going to ask why not but just realised this method will obviously only work as a spur off the radial or as the last light on the circuit as the live is cut whereas wiring at the rose allows the live to be maintained.

Cheers
 
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What sort of downlight did you have in mind?

Please be aware that halogen lamps give off a lot of heat. There must be at least 0.5metre from the lamp to anything in the cupboard or the fire engine will be coming to visit.

Better to use a fluorescent light of some sort.
 
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if its in a cupboard then unless its left on there wont be a lot of heat to worry about
 
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Cheers guys, was thinking of just halogen as most of the flourescent/low-energy ones seem to take too long to fully light up - especially in this scenario where it's a quick on/off.

The cupboard does have a full height louvre door so heat shouldn't be too much of an issue but can't get away from the fact it probably will get left on sometimes.

Could just stick an LED bulb in, they seem to be getting better and it's only to illuminate a cupboard!

Cheers all.
 
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if its in a cupboard then unless its left on there wont be a lot of heat to worry about

You are missing my point.
It's not the build up of heat in the cupboard, its that there must not be anything closer to the lamp than 0.5metre. It's stated on the instructions for every halogen lamp.
 
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I do take your point as I said I will probably go for an LED or even a 'normal' light bulb lol

I'm not sure about your universal rule on the halogens though - what about all those above kitchen countertops all over the place, screwed to the bottom of some mdf or chipboard wall units and inches away from the kitchen rolls!
 
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I was, perhaps, a bit too general. I was referring to 50watt MR16, GU10 lamps. Most of which have a 30cm or 50cm minimum distance.

Many undershelf lights are lower wattage (10/20watt) and include a secondary IR screen which further reduces heat radiation.
 
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LED is absoloutely the way to go for wardrobe lighting. There's no risk of fire if clothes come into contact with it, it's instantly at full brightness as soon as you turn it on, and if it does accidentally get left on it doesn't cost a fortune to run.

I'm not aware of an auto off pull switch. They are available as normal switches, or you could fit genie switches to the doors.
 
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Sorry, didn't know what a genie switch was ;)
I'll stick with my beer fridge door idea :LOL:
 
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