Advice on whether i'll need to get an electrician in?

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My outlaw's oven has packed up so they went to Currys and ordered a new oven and a matching hob and paid for installation.

When Curry's turned up they looked at the wiring (which is a single cooker cable outlet below the worktop from a cooker switch above the worktop) and said "we can't install this oven as you dont have a plug socket" and promptly took it all away.

After a fashion the outlaws spoke to Currys who send a different oven and hob which they said would fit but again the installers said they couldn't fit it as there wasn't a plug socket for the oven.

I am trying to get some information in order to advise them what they need to do about the situation.

I haven't had a chance to have a look at the wiring to the cooker outlet/switch. My guess is it probably 6mm as the mcb on that circuit is 32amp.

The new oven and hob they have chosen maximum power output with all hobs on and oven on max is 10.85Kw.

Am I right in thinking that with 240v and 10.85kw at max that would be 45amps current?

If so, what would be the best advice? Get an electrician in to wire the hob to the cooker outlet plate/switch 32amp circuit, and plug the oven (which incidentally comes fitted with a 13a plug) to a ring main socket?

Thanks in advance to any replies.
 
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If the cooker is rated at 10.85kW, at nominal voltage of 230V, tha maximum draw would be around 47A.
We can calculate diversity to that, which would give you about 21A or 26A if socket outlet on cooker isolator.
So why is there a need for a plug? This oven needs to be hard wired.
Or are oven and hob separate appliances?
Have you got model and make of the appliance(s)?

If so, what would be the best advice? Get an electrician in to wire the hob to the cooker outlet plate/switch 32amp circuit, and plug the oven (which incidentally comes fitted with a 13a plug) to a ring main socket?
Oh so the oven is plugged, details of hob please!
 
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Your oven requires a 13A socket outlet and the hob requires about 17A.
If you have an existing 32A rated cooker circuit on either 6.00mm or 4.00mm twin and earth, You could re-jig this radial circuit, so it can supply both appliances.
You would need to spur a 13A single socket outlet from the outlet plate and then hard wire the hob to the outlet plate. The socket would then require RCD protection.
So you do require an electrician.
 
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Thanks very much for the reply.

Their CU has an RCD on the main busbar, would this be sufficient?

Its all MCB but quite old and from memory only has about 6 or 8 mcb's and an RCD as it is quite a small house.
 
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Texted and reply back from outlaws as follows:

100amp 30ma covers whole house as its not a split load CU.
 
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Do you have any info to add to my last response please?

I will be seeing the outlaws again this afternoon so would good to have all the info to tell them.

Thanks :D
 
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Oh and I should add (from memory) I don't think the CU is split load. Its very small and as previously mentioned only has about 6 or so Mcb plus the RCD. For info its a Memera 21.
 
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Make sure theres room to put the socket in as it can be a real pain trying to put a socket in a tiled kitchen as it'll probably have to be sunk into the wall so the cooker will fit properly
 
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Thanks for the reply.

Can I ask, this is what they currently have. I don't think its quite right but apparently it was done by an electrician about 15 years ago.

The cooker switch has had 2.5mm t+e wired to the incoming side of the cooker switch which then runs down the wall (below the worktop) along the floor and then (believe it or not) into the cupboard underneath the sink and taps!

This has an unswitched 13a fused socket which has the washing machine plugged in to it.

So in essence they have an oven, the hob, washing machine and the kettle (plugged into the cooker switch socket). Is this likely to be overloaded?

How would you suggest this should be wired?
 
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A very quick drawing that hopefully explains it a bit better.

Cooker1.jpg
 
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The cooker switch has had 2.5mm t+e wired to the incoming side of the cooker switch which then runs down the wall (below the worktop) along the floor and then (believe it or not) into the cupboard underneath the sink and taps!
I'll let somebody else argue whether the 32A MCB provides adequate fault protection, and whether that 2.5mm² cable should be no longer than 3m...


So in essence they have an oven, the hob, washing machine and the kettle (plugged into the cooker switch socket). Is this likely to be overloaded?
The more you put on a circuit, the more likely it is to be overloaded.


How would you suggest this should be wired?
With the W/M socket on a different circuit.
 
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Thanks for the reply.

I figured that the best solution was to plug the washing machine in to another socket but I don't think there is another one anywhere near to the washing machine hence why I guess the electrician put the fused spur off the cooker socket.

Would a solution be to have a 2x fused sockets off the cooker outlet. One to supply the oven and the other to supply the washing if the washing cannot be plugged in anywhere else?

???
 
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I'd only have the cooker on a cooker circuit as who'd expect it to run a washing machine, but you could probably pull back the washing machine cable and use to to power the oven but it would probably not be as neat as having it just next door to the hobs socket and get a dedicated spur off the normal ring for the washing machine with perhaps a switch above the worktop to switch it off/on
 

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