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Are garden Wasps active at this time of year?

Discussion in 'In the Garden' started by Dylan123, 23 Oct 2021.

  1. Dylan123

    Dylan123

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    Odd question! I have a garden and have chopped down a tree and bushes etc last year. I piled the wood and branches etc by the entrance to the lane (to deter would be burglars as I don’t have a gate!)

    I need to now create a clearing as someone who lives with me has a bike and wants access.

    issue is, I am PETRIFIED of wasps and have had a phobia all my life (to the extent I run out of rooms as a 6 ft 3 16 stone man!)

    ive seen the odd wasp hanging around the pile, perhaps 2 or 3 on occasion. I’ve seen them in other parts of the garden too so not sure if they’ve built a nest in there.

    I was going to leave till the first hard frosts before poking around in there.

    I only need to clear a few rotten planks to create a space near enough to get through. I’ve gotten close to this without being attacked before.

    would I definitely know it if there was a nest there (ie there would be obviously loads of wasps there)?
    any way I can tell before I poke around?
    Do wasps build nests in piles of dead wood (seems like the kind of thing they would do)
    I know you can’t really outrun them once they’re p1ssed off and getting a bunch of them coming at me is something so terrifying I’m clenching just thinking of it!
    Advice please!
     
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  3. lostinthelight

    lostinthelight

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    Highly unlikely there will be an active nest there now. The workers have done their job of rearing the next generation and have died or dying off while the queens have tucked themselves away ready to make new nests next spring.
     
  4. Dylan123

    Dylan123

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    ah I thought they would still be there now and super aggressive as it’s the autumn
     
  5. RayCaister

    RayCaister

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    Instruct the person with the bicycle how they can best clear a pathway.
     
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  6. Dylan123

    Dylan123

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  7. mattylad

    mattylad

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    If your the owner of this lane or the access and the person with the cycle has a right to pass over it then you are not allowed to block it.
    You should make it so that they can pass/repass and they will be entitled to the entire width of their right of way.

    You could always add a gate, that's allowed as long as the others with a row can still pass through it.
     
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  8. conny

    conny

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    Depending on where you live in the country may determine the correct answer. The further north you are the better the chance they are inactive.
    Wasps are not really active below 10C and those that are will be quite sluggish, (so plenty of time to run). Strictly speaking the temp has to be below 7C for 5 continuous days before they die but if there is a nest then the internal temperature may stay above this.
    I would suggest wearing some thick trousers and a coat with a pair of gardening gloves and some form of mesh face covering if you are really afraid, (and I respect anyone who is), and remove the pieces carefully. The odd one or two are highly unlikely to sting you as they will be fairly lethargic and easy to swat, (have someone stand over you with one of those battery operated tennis bats that kill flies).
     
  9. Dylan123

    Dylan123

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    I did it anyway and took the risk - no wasp attack.

    I do wonder what these things purpose is. They are gods joke, I’d happily barbecue a nest with a blowtorch if I wasn’t too cowardly to get anywhere near it!

    im sure they fill some purpose but can’t another species, say, ladybirds, take over their workload? Ladybirds aren’t miniature singing versions of Hitler
     
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  11. conny

    conny

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    Wasps are actually quite productive in the garden. They help pollinate plants/flowers just as bees do but they also strip dead wood and eat a number of potential garden pests such as greenfly and many caterpillars. Without them there would be many more annoying insects, some of which can bite.
     
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  12. Dylan123

    Dylan123

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    that’s great bit still, if I won euromillions I’d probably pay to make them extinct!
     
  13. scbk

    scbk

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    Don't be such a fairy, your nan could outrun a wasp! :rolleyes:
    Who needs pollinators, food is overrated anyway.


    Get rid of the debris and get a gate - if there'd been a fire or medical emergency you'd be stuffed :confused:
     
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  14. Dylan123

    Dylan123

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    gate is at the back and it’s only to a footpath.

    I am indeed a massive fairy when it comes to wasps.

    I’m a massive guy and my wife is 5 foot dead and about 7 stone, and she often gets irritated by having to get rid of wasps while I’m cowering upstairs.

    however, don’t mind spider one bit so I happily get rid of them for her. It’s just something about wasps angry buzzing and movement which freaks me out
     
  15. Nozzle

    Nozzle

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    You need some CBT!

    Nozzle
     
  16. mattylad

    mattylad

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    Wasps are actually better pollinators than the bees that everyone seems to love now.

    I heard that Bees are descended from the wasp.
    I have a nest somewhere near me, I get visited by one often and they do me no harm because I leave them alone.
    Although not seen one for a few weeks due to the temperature.
     
  17. Dylan123

    Dylan123

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    bees are ok. I can’t say I like them but if I had one inside the house I can get them out without a panic attack. Bees just want to get on with their business.

    wasps on the other side are like a marauding criminals, just out looking for a ruck.
     
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