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Bathroom project

Discussion in 'Your Projects' started by jonbey, 14 Aug 2019.

  1. jonbey

    jonbey

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    Next project started today. Turning a box room (2.36m square) into a bathroom.
    1930s bungalow, solid 9 inch external brick walls, internal brick walls, suspended wood floor.

    Started lifting floorboards and removed some skirting. Usual: rotten joists, rotten skirting boards, blocked air bricks, radiator pipes with no insulation, and about an inch of dirt. Need to replace 2 joists nearest the external wall, and some of the sleeper wall timbers (looks like they have been replaced once before!). There is no air brick in this room (totally covered externally) so I will have 2 new added when the drainage is done.

    Plan is to move the radiator to the wall on the right, next to the door. Brick up the lower part of the window, replace top with new frosted window. Toilet on left wall next to external wall, basin below the window, shower in the left corner.

    box room.jpg

    Ideally, the toilet will go right above where the 2nd joist and mains water pipe is, but I guess it will have to go a left between the joists. There is a WC in the room behind this wall (which will be removed) so hoping I can attach the drainage. But, got a shower waste dilemma - want a low level shower tray... thinking of cutting the ends of the joists and using large ply sheets for flooring, so the shower waste can run along the edge to the external wall.

    bathroom floor.jpg

    This is the rough plan....
    bathroom.png

    The radiator pipes are in the perfect place to be cut and have a new rad fitted to the right. There is also only one electric socket, which is spurred from the back of the socket in the hall, so I can remove this.

    For extractor, there is an old air brick cavity in the top left, so thinking of putting a wall mounted extractor there - is that a good idea, or is ceiling always best?

    The external wall will be insulated with 50-70cm of Kingspan. I want a shaver point by the basin. Shower will be from the boiler. I have a couple of spare slots on the consumer unit so could get an electrician to run a new circuit for shaver and extractor, and leave the light as it is.

    Also plan to replaster the whole room (new ceiling boards) then just have a tiled (or wall boards) shower area. Or even a cabin - although these cost too much really.

    Not sure on flooring - is plywood the best option, or a good chipboard OK? Will just have a single sheet of vinyl on top, so should be watertight. The plumbing will come down from the ceiling, so all that will be buried under the floor (which I will be insulating with 50mm kingspan with 50mm rockwall on top) will be the radiator pipes and shower / toilet drainage.

    Tomorrow I'll mostly be clearing all that dust and dirt out, and pulling out nails.

    Feedback and suggestions welcome.
     
  2. blup

    blup

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    Why not retain the full window aperture to maximise natural light - and natural ventilation.

    Blup
     
  3. jonbey

    jonbey

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    Neighbour's front door is right opposite, even with frosted glass they'd get an eye full when i shower!

    IMG_20190815_100018174_HDR.jpg
     
  4. jonbey

    jonbey

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    Well, I found the air brick. Almost completely buried from the outside, just the very top visible. Have requested a quote to get that concrete path removed ... the other air bricks are still visible, path seems to rise at this point. Pretty sure it is not needed? So getting it removed and then just have gravel over it.

    airbrick.png

    path.jpg
     

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    Last edited: 5 Sep 2019
  5. jonbey

    jonbey

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    oh, and cleared out the floor, 3 buckets of dust....

    IMG_20190815_163819493.jpg
     
  6. funinacup

    funinacup

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    How's this going?
     
  7. jonbey

    jonbey

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    Moving along. Had my plumber over the other day to decide where to put the drainage. Coming back to look at the WC in the next room that we're removing.

    The WC in the next room (which was partitioned from a bedroom - I'll be removing that stud wall next)
    IMG_20190903_141917068.jpg


    So plan is to remove the toilet and cut the drainage back to floor (or near) and add new pipe and run it down this room. Then toilet and shower will go straight out of room into it (with a 45 degrees bend I guess). I've cleaned that floor out too, amazing how much dust on those floors - another bucket for the wc. Lots of bad rot on the joist running along the outside wall. But very dry in general and the bits of wood laying on the ground were rot free, so only rot was on external walls.

    Oh, and had the concrete outside smashed up. Need to remove more (doing a few buckets at a time). This air brick was completely covered. I'll dig down a bit, weed membrane and shingle / gravel the whole path.

    IMG_20190831_152608981_HDR.jpg
     
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  8. securespark

    securespark

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    It's nuts what some people do to air bricks. I must have seen hundreds of them blocked up in various ways, usually with silicone sealant.

    Can you resite that telecomms JB? Just looks unsightly there.

    Be interested to follow your exploits. I have an ensuite shower that has been leaking for who knows how many years (rotted floor, joists and studding) and a bathroom (refitted 5 years ago but done very badly) where the tray is leaking L, R & C.
     
  9. securespark

    securespark

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    I ripped out my shower in the en-suite to find a socket behind the tiles!!!!

    What's the pipe that cuts a diagonal under the floor?

    EDIT: We have blackout blinds in our bathrooms, which are great to block out embarrassing outlines!
     
    Last edited: 5 Sep 2019
  10. jonbey

    jonbey

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    I have socket right where the shower will go! Easy to remove though.

    Pipe is mains water.

    Change of plan - drainage will now go straight into new bathroom. Might be putting a resin stone tray straight onto the joists too. Idea is to ensure easier access to drainage should anything need changing in future, and will have easier access point for dealing with blockages.

    Plumber might be ready to start next week!
     
  11. jonbey

    jonbey

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    Update

    IMG_20190914_123828228.jpg
    IMG_20190911_153855964.jpg

    Last night I stuck kingspan on the underside of the flooring that the shower will sit on. If I had planned this better I would probably have put the noggins and floor in lower and put the kingspan onto it, then mortar straight over that.
    IMG_20190917_225320091.jpg


    Would it be sensible / normal to ask the plumber to put a damp membrane over the shower tray area before mortaring in the tray? If there is ever a leak, more chance it will find its way to concrete subfloor and evaporate than soak into the wood?
     
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