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Bathroom refit Save tiles or new.

Discussion in 'Tiling' started by camerart, 31 Jul 2016.

  1. camerart

    camerart

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    Hi,
    My bathroom is from back in time, with a cast iron bath (pale green), foliage green tiles, basin (pale green) with lead drain.
    The tiles came from the tile factory (now housing) just behind my house, and I've avoided chipping them off because of historical interest.
    This is a taste question and I suppose a house value question also. Should I chip off the old, but good tiles, and all of the fittings and fit a new bathroom throughout, or is there any merit in keeping old historical fitments?
    Camerart
     
  2. geraldthehamster

    geraldthehamster

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    Is it all in good condition? Photo?
     
  3. camerart

    camerart

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    I'll post a photo next week, thanks.
     
  4. vinn

    vinn

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    There's much merit in keeping old fitments - dont change a thing except maybe the fill and flush valves in the WC cistern. Hopefully, you have the old taps, & all they might need is re-washering.

    Its common knowledge that old adds value to a property, even worn aspects have charm, & are much nicer to live with.
     
  5. camerart

    camerart

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    Hi,
    While I've been away, I've had some suggestions and thoughts from, strip the lot out, refit and tile it with quality stuff, and make it all a wet room, this includes the cupboard behind the basin where I have drawn 'CHIMNEY' as a shower. This will make it a 'Window wall 9Ft x 7Ft 7Inch room. Another similar refit, where the door includes the Toilet shown in the 'Bathroom inc toilet' photo. (There will be a second toilet downstairs.) One suggestion was to have the cast iron bath repainted.
    Is it possible to make a wet room on floor boards, on first floor?
    There is a string switch shower power point, also the choice of boiler supplied shower (gravity fed)
    EDIT: Photo2 is best for colour.
    Camerart.
     

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  6. geraldthehamster

    geraldthehamster

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    What age is your house, 1920/30s? None of that stuff is high end, and the colour is unfashionable, so if you were selling, you'd add value by fitting a new, good quality bathroom, perhaps in a style that suits the house. But the first and most important question is, do you like it?

    Cheers
    Richard
     
  7. vinn

    vinn

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    What you have is a 1950's bathroom.

    Painting or enamelling baths usually ends in tears.
    For a price you can have a wetroom on the first floor or almost anywhere else.
    Your shower is a mixer type?
    Making it worthwhile to Knock through for a WC recess would usually depend on where the existing soil pipe is located.
    But, in your case, it might be best to simply convert the cupboard to a WC compartment - no knocking through?

    But its almost useless speculating without a dimensioned floor plan for any proposals.

    OP, if you persist on here then transfer your questions to the Plumbing Forum.
     
  8. camerart

    camerart

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    1906.
    I'm not that keen on the tiles as they are dark, although I can see why someone would choose them. I was thinking too sentimentally about the factory behind the house where they were made, but that thought is going away.
    It sounds as if I may as well add value by fitting a new good quality bathroom, and enjoy it myself.
    C.
     
  9. geraldthehamster

    geraldthehamster

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    That makes more sense. I was trying to reconcile the bathroom window with the fittings ;)

    If it were me (which of course it isn't), I'd be looking for white Victorian/Edwardian style sanitaryware.

    Cheers
    Richard
     
  10. camerart

    camerart

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    Ok new bath no tears:)
    Ok on the wetroom, can it stay almost at the same level as the entrance?
    The shower will be where the cupboard is behind the basin, and has a new dedicated string switch installed or can bee from the boiler tank.
    The existing toilet is this side of the bathroom, see Bathroom inc toilet photo. I think I'll keep it separate as it is.
    I think this post has been moved already, but I'm mainly asking for advice on taste really. I'll probably have more questions once I've made my mind up.
    C
     
  11. camerart

    camerart

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    Ok. thanks. c.
     
  12. geraldthehamster

    geraldthehamster

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    I'm not sure you've come to the right place for that ;)
     
  13. vinn

    vinn

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    What strange gnomic business is this:
    First the poster is identifying the house as "1920/1930s" - then claiming that, actually, 1906 "makes more sense" to him because he: "was trying to reconcile the bathroom window with the fittings."

    The mind boggles; stop the clocks, a new method of identifying the age of a house is upon us, really, all you have to do is reconcile the bathroom window with the bathroom fittings & Bob the Builder's your uncle.

    Perhaps the poster would like to answer two questions:
    1. what fittings are you referring to?
    2. Exactly what aspect of the window can you see to tie in with your explanation?
     
  14. geraldthehamster

    geraldthehamster

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    If you really want to know, which I'm sure you don't: The bathroom appears to have a sash window, so as the sanitaryware and tiles are in an Art Deco colour, I put them together in the 1920s. It didn't occur to me that the bathroom might have been installed in the 1950s, as lead piping had begun to be phased out by then. I really don't know why I'm bothering to feed the troll.
     
  15. vinn

    vinn

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    The term sash window has a number of definitions - which one specifically are you referring to?
    Perhaps you mean a double-hung sash window frame?

    The lead pipework is not a fitting it is pipework.

    In your explanation how does: "1906 make more sense"?
     
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