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Board choice for lining fireplace builders opening

Discussion in 'Plastering and Rendering' started by fatmcgav, 19 Jul 2020.

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  1. fatmcgav

    fatmcgav

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    Evening all,

    So I'm currently renovating the living room in our victorian end terrace.

    As part of this, I've removed the old gas fireplace that we never used, and have built the chimney breast out about 40mm in order to provide some more depth for alcove bookcases.

    I'm now working on lining the builders opening.
    I'd originally intended on using normal plasterboard; however I then had the thought about how to handle damp etc, as it's a capped chimney behind.

    Is normal plasterboard suitable, or should I be aiming to use MR Plasterboard or cement board such as hardiebacker.

    One side and rear is going to be fixed to studwork, but the other side is going to be sticky foamed onto the brickwork and screwed at the front.

    This is what it looks like right now:
    IMG_20200719_171730.jpg IMG_20200719_165227.jpg IMG_20200719_165219.jpg

    Once boarded, the fireplace is going to be plastered and painted, and left as an open space for ornaments or similar.

    Thoughts?

    Thanks in advance.
    Gavin
     
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  3. lostinthelight

    lostinthelight

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    If your thinking damp, then Im thinking treated timber?
     
  4. JohnD

    JohnD

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    a capped chimney should be ventilated top and bottom to prevent damp.

    it may also help to dig the rubble out from under the hearth, down to oversite level, because it will not have a dpm so will draw damp up from the ground.
     
  5. fatmcgav

    fatmcgav

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    Wrt ventilation, I was planning on hiding a small vent in the top panel, so should be good there.

    And Yeh, I was also thinking about the ground level and damp, and maybe pulling all the crap out and then putting some concrete in there to level up...
     
  6. JohnD

    JohnD

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    If you have a wooden floor with a ventilated void beneath, you can open a ventilation gap under the floor once you have dug out the hearth.

    The chimney must also be ventilated at the top. Both flues.
     
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  8. fatmcgav

    fatmcgav

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    It was previously a suspended floor, however when I started this renovation I discovered that everything had rotten out. So had to replace with a concrete floor with. Took the opportunity to add wet ufh aswell.
     
  9. JohnD

    JohnD

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    Did you find and rectify the source of water?
     
  10. fatmcgav

    fatmcgav

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    So the issue was dry rot rather than damp in the floor.

    There was also very poor ventilation which was probably the primary cause.
     
  11. bennymultifinish

    bennymultifinish

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    hardiebacker covers all bases. but if your confident it’s dry just use vapour board. (foil back board)
     
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