Breaking up Concrete Drive for Block Paving

Discussion in 'Building' started by Screwed, 10 Mar 2014.

  1. Screwed

    Screwed

    Joined:
    22 Nov 2005
    Messages:
    300
    Thanks Received:
    12
    Location:
    London
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Hi All,

    After the relative success of laying my first patio - 40m2 of Indian Stone, I now want to have a go at doing our driveway.

    I'm just at the planning stage at present, not 100% sure of if, or when to tackle it!! Is block paving easier than slabs as you lay onto sand rather than a mix?

    My main question is, our current drive is 4-6" of poured concrete, as and when I break this up can I re-use it as a partial sub, meaning I's need less MOT Type 1?

    Just trying to cost everything up before starting!

    Many thanks!
     
  2. Sponsored Links
  3. cotswoldbuilders

    cotswoldbuilders

    Joined:
    22 Sep 2011
    Messages:
    784
    Thanks Received:
    166
    Location:
    Gloucestershire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    You wont break the concrete up small enough to use as hardcore.

    You will need a breaker, or if its a large area, mini digger with a breaker fitted.
     
  4. Screwed

    Screwed

    Joined:
    22 Nov 2005
    Messages:
    300
    Thanks Received:
    12
    Location:
    London
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Thanks, I was going to hire/buy a breaker. The drive is about 30' long and 10' wide, already done some of it with an SDS when I had to put a new soil pipe in, broke up fairly easy......
     
  5. ban-all-sheds

    ban-all-sheds

    Joined:
    27 Aug 2003
    Messages:
    69,782
    Thanks Received:
    2,858
    Location:
    London
    Country:
    United Kingdom
  6. ban-all-sheds

    ban-all-sheds

    Joined:
    27 Aug 2003
    Messages:
    69,782
    Thanks Received:
    2,858
    Location:
    London
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    He could hire a crusher.

    So it's cost of that, vs cost of paying to have the old concrete taken away + the cost of buying hardcore.

    Screwed - let us know if you find out how that equation balances....
     
  7. Screwed

    Screwed

    Joined:
    22 Nov 2005
    Messages:
    300
    Thanks Received:
    12
    Location:
    London
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Mmm, thanks, I'll try and do some sums!! With regards to laying the blocks, we're not having a pattern, going for irregular sized blocks, in my mind this seems easier rather than trying to lay the same size blocks in say a herringbone pattern. Am I still wrong in thinking this is easier than laying slabs, I have read the Paving Expert website obsessively a number of times and still think I can do it..........
     
  8. r896neo

    r896neo

    Joined:
    23 Feb 2007
    Messages:
    4,767
    Thanks Received:
    780
    Location:
    Belfast
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    There is less skill required to lay block paving but more basic knowledge and setting up.

    Once you have your screed rails in it all flies down compared to mortar bedding. its also more compliant in the sense that a vibrating plate will help hide any high blocks etc.

    A pattern is not in any way difficult. Laying in stretcher bond is fast and easiest but herringbone is better for a driveway as its more stable under lateral loads.

    This is not an issue if your drive is straight with no turning.

    Assuming its not super thick a 14lb sledge hammer is much faster than a breaker. Hard work though
     
  9. themiddleagedun

    themiddleagedun

    Joined:
    8 Jun 2010
    Messages:
    323
    Thanks Received:
    68
    Location:
    Lancashire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Just a thought.. seeing as how you've got the concrete already. Have you considered resin-bonded gravel?
     
  10. Sponsored Links
  11. Screwed

    Screwed

    Joined:
    22 Nov 2005
    Messages:
    300
    Thanks Received:
    12
    Location:
    London
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Yeah I have.........but the Mrs wants it to match next door!! Seems as though as long as I get the edging set right, the rest should be pretty easy......
     
  12. eyedee

    eyedee

    Joined:
    28 Sep 2007
    Messages:
    99
    Thanks Received:
    1
    Location:
    Surrey
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Grab a Titan breaker from screwfix for the concrete removal. It's only £150 or so and worth every penny.

    I removed my front and rear garden poured concrete bases (each approx. 30'x20') and decided to save money by using the 'good' concrete as hardcore. 4 days and two very used sledge hammers later and I had 6 tonne bags of MOT1 sized concrete stones ready for use.

    Saved about £260-300. Would I every do it again? No chance! It was friggin torture. Just go buy the MOT from wickes. With free delivery that was the cheapest available when I did the work last summer. Also, buy through Quidco and get a few £pounds back.
     
  13. ban-all-sheds

    ban-all-sheds

    Joined:
    27 Aug 2003
    Messages:
    69,782
    Thanks Received:
    2,858
    Location:
    London
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    There's quite a few on ebay for even less. Probably the sort of tool people buy as they don't need it for long, and it works out cheaper to do that and sell it afterwards than hiring.

    But I think I'd be tempted to look on ebay for a far superior Bosch/Hilti/Kango, again to sell on when finished. TCA would be higher, but TCO low.
     
  14. eyedee

    eyedee

    Joined:
    28 Sep 2007
    Messages:
    99
    Thanks Received:
    1
    Location:
    Surrey
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    I've had a Titan (actually an Erbauer, but they're one and the same) for 3 years and used it on loads of projects. It's never missed a beat and is surprisingly powerful and robust.

    I wouldn't bother buying a 'better' branded one if you're just planning on selling it afterwards. If it gets damaged you'll lose a heap of dosh. And if you buy a really cheap one off ebay (especially if you plan to keep it) try and make sure it comes with a warranty. The screwfix one has a 2 year warranty, which could just come in handy.

    Check out the customer reviews. Plenty of people surprised with just how good the tool is:

    http://www.screwfix.com/p/titan-ttb280drh-15-5kg-breaker-230v/67819
     
    • Thanks Thanks x 1
  15. Screwed

    Screwed

    Joined:
    22 Nov 2005
    Messages:
    300
    Thanks Received:
    12
    Location:
    London
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Yeah I'd planned on buying one of these, got the Titan SDS and that was fantastic for knocking out the drive for the new waste, especially for the 50 odd quid it cost me. I was even looking at buying a whacker plate on ebay, that way I could do the drive in sections rather than trying to hire one and get it all done in a weekend. Thanks for all the advice, certainly feel confident in taking the project on now!
     
  16. eyedee

    eyedee

    Joined:
    28 Sep 2007
    Messages:
    99
    Thanks Received:
    1
    Location:
    Surrey
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Haha, that's exactly what I did. I bought a medium heavy one for £170 odd to compact the rear garden hardcore last summer. The job was a big one and was split over a few weeks. Only wish I'd bought the whacker sooner as it would have saved me even more cash when I did the front drive a couple years earlier.

    The only issue is storing it. I'm not selling it as I'll only regret it when the next job comes-a-calling out of the blue.

    All the best with your project.
     
  17. DIYnot Local

    DIYnot Local

    Joined:
    3 Sep 2019
    Country:
    United Kingdom

    If you need to find a tradesperson to get your job done, please try our local search below, or if you are doing it yourself you can find suppliers local to you.

    Select the supplier or trade you require, enter your location to begin your search.


    Are you a trade or supplier? You can create your listing free at DIYnot Local

     
Loading...

Share This Page