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core drill recomendations please......

Discussion in 'Tools and Materials' started by sonofrob, 5 Nov 2017.

  1. sonofrob

    sonofrob

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    hello can any of you lads recommend a decent core drill to buy,,,ive had enough of hiring them and fancy my own,,,the last couple Ive hired one nearly tore my arms out the sockets when drilling around 10 holes,,,not sure what make it was,,,kept spinning out of my grip no matter how tight i held on,,,too much power???,,,the other was a marcrist which worked like a dream and cut through the wall like a hot knife through butter......
     
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  3. Which ever machine you buy ensure that it has a clutch - lucky you didn't do yourself a serious injury.

    Metabo BDE1100
    Makita DMB131
    Dewalt D21570
     
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  4. Roger928

    Roger928

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    There you go. Good make.
     
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  5. ^woody^

    ^woody^

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    Any drill will do, you just need to alter your technique. You're pressing too hard, it's a saw not a bit.
     
  6. opps

    opps

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    I wouldn't want to drill an extractor fan hole with an 18 volt cordless.

    With regard to the technique, yes it is important but I have had bits grab halfway through a 9 inch wall when bricks have broken and impeded the progress of the core bit. I was not applying undue pressure at the time. It's under those circumstances that you appreciate a safety clutch.

    In short, I do not agree that "any" drill will suffice. Sorry, I have agreed with many of your previous posts, but not this one.
     
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  7. opps

    opps

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    I see that the Makita has its own water cooling. How effective is it?

    BTW, thanks for the recommendations. I really should get a proper core drill...
     
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  9. ^woody^

    ^woody^

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    Yes you are right, a clutch is better to have.

    I was being perhaps a bit too glib, but the drill I use most often does not have a clutch. I'm aware of it and don't tend to be caught unawares. But if the wall was going to be tough, or I had loads of holes to cut then I would consider using another model with clutch or a specific core drill.
     
  10. opps

    opps

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    Fair play.

    For the record, I once ruined a rather expensive marble bath top whilst drilling a 25mm core for the pull out hand shower. I had already cut the hole in the marble and then had to cut down and through the steel bath. I was using my cordless drill, drilling slowly but clearly zoned out at some point. The core bit snagged. I hadn't set the torque. When it snagged my finger was jammed against the trigger. In a panic I yanked the drill. It made a shallow but 10mm long splinter of marble.

    It was large enough to be seen when the fitting was installed. I ended up paying a firm £75 to (next day) make what basically a large washer out of polished stainless steel to put under the fitting.

    I fessed up to the client. They were ok (fortunately).

    I would no longer want to use a drill without a clutch, not just because of safety but additionally because some mistakes can be expensive.
     
  11. rochdalegas

    rochdalegas

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  12. sonofrob

    sonofrob

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    DSC_0010.JPG DSC_0011.JPG i went for the same dewalt also mate,,,after reading a lot of reviews on each drill this one seemed the one to get,,,with the erbauer core drill set,,,is it just me or do other people love buying new tools,,,???,,,I enjoy going to the tool shop just as much as buying new clothes,,,:D:ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO:......
     
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  13. muggles

    muggles

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    Diaquip
     
  14. cdbe

    cdbe

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    I bought a new Dewalt D21570. On the 3rd use (I was actually using it on the hammer action to put a 22mm masonry bit through a half (engineering) brick garden wall) it was struggling and the clutch was working hard and the motor was getting quite warm (but no more so than any of my other Bosch or Dewalt drills) - I was reassured that the fancy electronic protection system would kick in and protect the drill if necessary.
    Drill stopped, "problem" light came on. Dewalt service centre laughed, diagnosed burnt out motor without any examination, laughed again when I mentioned the electronic protection system and said they'd stopped selling this model themselves as it was upsetting their customers! Dewalt replaced motor and I still have it but have no trust in it and "nurse" it every time I use it. I would have put it down to bad luck were it not for the opinion of the Dewalt service centre on this particular model.
     
  15. DIYnot Local

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