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Damaged plasterboard edges

Discussion in 'Plastering and Rendering' started by graffspider, 12 Jun 2007.

  1. graffspider

    graffspider

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    I'm drylining my living room and have boarded it out ready for a plasterer to skim it. A couple of the plasterboard edges have been a bit damaged when I've put them in:

    The lower edges of the boards that were sat on the packers are a bit 'flappy' in parts, where the paper has come away from the plaster a bit but I'm not worried about this as the skirting board will cover it.

    The bit that concerns me slightly is where one of the wall boards meets the ceiling has been a bit damaged through being a little tight when I was putting it on, leaving a perhaps a 15cm radius semi-circle of damage at the top. Would the plasterer be able to skim over this or will I need to cut it out & pop a new square of board in its place? If so, does anyone have any tips on the best way to do this?

    I'm anticipating it will be a nightmare to cut out the now firmly adhered board - I didn't want to do it at the time though as I didn't want to get the rest of the board out of position when I was ragging it about.
     
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  3. FredFlintstone

    FredFlintstone

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    Graff,

    If it's the sort of damage I am thiking it is from your description then your plasterer should just be able to skim over it. Depending on the severity of the damage it may still be visible as an "unstraight" section of the wall but if you can live with that then I wouldn't worry about it.

    regards

    Fred.
     
  4. graffspider

    graffspider

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    Cheers Fred - I'll leave it for my plasterer to skim.
     
  5. Ratter

    Ratter

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    Coving could also be used to hide it
     
  6. Richard C

    Richard C

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    Yuk!
     
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  8. FredFlintstone

    FredFlintstone

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    What's wrong with coving?

    I've gotta stick coving up throughout my whole house because the whole house is wonky and I need to hide the wavy joins between ceiing and wall. I've tried to make them look better when replastering but it's just no use - coving it is.

    Regards

    Fred
     
  9. Richard C

    Richard C

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    Purely a personal choice really; we’ve had coving in all our previous houses (2 of them new) but it’s like having an Avocado bathroom suite, Old Charm furniture (we sold all ours with the last house) & swirl pattern Artex, all a bit 80’s!

    The ceilings & walls in our current renovation are not so good either, Artex stipple everywhere & really poorly fitted coving which I’m ripping down before re-skimming the walls & ceilings. But if you like it or need to hide the join then it serves its purpose well; as I said, purely personal choice.
     
  10. FredFlintstone

    FredFlintstone

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    Fair enough. It's true that everyone's tastes are different and for me, coving ain't for decoration, it's to hide a bent house. I'll admit that I'm not the best plasterer in the world (I have only been doing it full time for a few months afterall) but my corners and angles are spot on. However, that just seems to highlight the unevenness in this house even more!

    Fashions come and go and tastes change. That's why it's always best to keep things as generic as possible (i.e white bath suite as opposed to the afore mentioned avacado), especially if not settling for a long time.

    Regards

    Fred
     
  11. Richard C

    Richard C

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    We sold everything (even the monster TV) with our last house when we moved 3 years ago because we wanted a change to contemporary décor & furniture. What I find really interesting is that it’s gone full circle & a lot of the stuff we bought for our first house in the 70's & then skipped in the 80's is now very desirable & fits almost perfectly with what is supposed to be ‘today’s’ modern design!
     
  12. DIYnot Local

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