Damp on front door sides

Discussion in 'Wood / Woodwork / Carpentry' started by stevs, 10 Apr 2020.

  1. stevs

    stevs

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    Just bought a house and the front door area is looking a little sorry for itself. Does it look like the damp parts at the bottom of each side of the door can be saved? Or what other options do I have?

    IMG_20200410_101645.jpg
     
  2. foxhole

    foxhole

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    Get some treated timber and replace the lot, try to avoid touching the ground to slow rot and remove anything growing.
     
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  4. stevs

    stevs

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    Really, is it not worth salvaging? I was thinking about cutting the last 50cm away or so, and maybe fixing a new bit of timber somehow - or do you think that just wouldn't look good?
     
  5. foxhole

    foxhole

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    From what I can see seems to be rotten in a few areas including the top .
     
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  7. JohnD

    JohnD

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    you can replace the "feet" of the frame. But first, what are the dimensions of the timber sections? Is it trim or actual frame? (looks very wide)

    the usual method is to saw through them above all trace of rot, with a diagonal cut, then make up a new piece following the same angle to fit in. Soak the new piece very thoroughly in spirit-based wood preserver and allow to dry before fitting.

    I'm lucky enough to live near a boat-building area and bought offcuts of teak for repairs. Typical modern softwood joinery is not durable outdoors.

    But it is likely to be fixed to the wall (not supported off the ground) so you could instead use a concrete or terracotta plinth block, painted to match the wall perhaps. This will not rot, and will space the timber off the ground. You can use mortar betwen the brickwork and the block.

    It's possible to cast such concrete items yourself, but you need to mix very well, and preferably immerse in water for a couple of weeks to cure and reach maximum strength before fixing.
     
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  8. DIYnot Local

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