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Downlight lumens - not enough or too much?

Discussion in 'Electrics UK' started by Dylan T, 9 Jan 2021.

  1. Dylan T

    Dylan T

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    Hi all -

    I'm adding integrated downlights to a new kitchen extension which is 4m x 3.5m with a 2.5m ceiling, and am a little confused as I've previously only used ones with replaceable bulbs. I see the benefits of integrated, but I'm concerned I lose the ability to control brightness and colour - I've purchased a 10 pack of these, but have just installed one (370 lumens) and am concerned it's not as bright as I hoped, but the like for like alternative is 500 lumens. I've used a room calculation tool which tells me I need 3500 lumens which for the 8 spots is 437.5 lumens each.
    In this situation would someone recommend overshooting or undershooting? I'm concerned either will be problematic, but want to get it right as each light has a different cut out diameter.

    Thanks for any help
     
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  3. flameport

    flameport

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    Based on what other criteria?

    Seems very low for a kitchen of that size, as does only 8 downlights.
    Will there be any other lighting in the room?
     
  4. Dylan T

    Dylan T

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    I didn't make the tool, but it seems the calculation is the square meterage (14) x 250 to give you the lumens (so 3500). The electricians who did first fix said 8 would be fine, which is why it's 8! But they've asked me to sort getting the lights as they're on other jobs at the moment and hard to get hold of (another story!). The room in question isn't actually the kitchen but the extnesion off the kitchen which is more of a dining area, but it does only have 2 walls, connecting to the kicthen itself (just a knocked through wall between them) and living area. To be fair to the electricians I've been looking at various images of rooms that size and 8 downlights seems quite common, but if you think that's not much then maybe erring on side of too bright is safest. Just seems a shame there's so little control - to me you should be able to get an adjustable switch that you can set then turn on or off.
     
  5. winston1

    winston1

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    Ones with replaceable bulbs are to be preferred because you can replace the bulbs. With the integrated type you have to replace the whole thing and quite likely by that time a matching one is no longer available.
     
  6. Swwils

    Swwils

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    In a kitchen you may want to check the beam angle and diffuser type for the downlights you use.

    These make a massive difference to the quality of the light output.

    Also do not forget to consider plinth lights, if you are every visiting the kitchen late at night for a snack, they are great so you don't dazzle yourself!
     
  7. flameport

    flameport

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    250 lux is probably reasonable for a dining area, however for food preparation 500+ would be more usual. However that could be provided by other lighting such as under-cabinet lights to illuminate the worktop only, it doesn't all have to be from ceiling lights.

    Like most kitchen showrooms, often designed for looks rather than actually using.
     
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