Drilling into tiles

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Hello,

I've recently purchased a house and it lacks shelving in the ensuite so I'm putting some small glass shelves on one of the outdoor walls and in the corner of the shower itself. I just wanted to check if the approach I'm thinking of taking is correct and a few questions too.

From what I understand the safest way (have not drilled through tiling before) is to put masking tape onto the wall, mark the drill points then use a tile drill piece to go through the tile then switch to a masonry one to go through the wall.

The one main question I have is should I drill into the wall further than needed so the plug goes behind the tile and won't expand into it? Or should I drill the hole in the tile larger than the plug? I've read it can often be the plug expanding that causes the tile to crack.

Second question is there anything else I should use? I won't use hammer action on the drill and will take it slow while going through the tile.
 

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Some tiles (standard sort) are easy with a good quantity masonry drill like dewalt extreme. Dont use hammer and go on slow speed or tickle the drill trigger.


Others like procelain need diamond drill kit and water. Those kits a cheap enough. Not a problem either way
 
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A typical porcelain drill (diamond tipped) costs around £16-20 for a 6mm size. A guide certainly helps as they tend to slip other wise. A plywood jig can be made cheaply or erbauer one from screwfix is OK.

Your tiles look like porcelain to me.
 
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If using a diamond tipped drill in a cordless, rest the heel of the battery on the surface and touch the edge of the bit to the surface. It's far easier to control like this. Once you have cut a crescent, as the bit starts to bite, you can then bring the drill slowly vertical and finish off. It stops the bit skidding all over when you try to start the hole.
 
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