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Fire resistant board

Discussion in 'Tools and Materials' started by Burnerman, 25 Oct 2011.

  1. Burnerman

    Burnerman

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    First there was Asbestolux, then came along Supalux......is this stuff still around?
    I need a piece about 20mm thick, 1 metre long by about 100mm wide - I'm completely out of touch concerning these materials.
    Cheers and good evening
    John :)
     
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  3. ^woody^

    ^woody^

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    There is also masterboard which is cheaper and available in thicker boards

    Or the hardibacker tile boards
     
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  4. muggles

    muggles

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    I'll second the Hardibacker, that stuff is pretty much indestructible it seems. It won't be thick enough as it comes but provided you can cut and double up it'll be fine
     
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  5. Richard C

    Richard C

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    How fire resistant do you need it to be, what are you using it for? For continuous heat applications, you need a silicate based board; you have to be careful of lighter/cheaper Gypsum based boards as they are only fire resistant for a one off application after which they will be useless.
     
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  6. Burnerman

    Burnerman

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    Gentlemen, I sincerely thank you for your comments.
    This is the scenario - my holiday cottage has a wood burning stove, surrounded by a traditional timber fire surround. The wood burner kicks out so much heat that the mantlepiece - for want of a better term - gets very hot on the underside - obviously not enough for ignition but you can hardly touch it by hand - even though its nearly a metre away from the burner. The varnish starts to smell hot.
    Its my intention just to install a strip of some sound of fire resistant board on the underside of the mantlepiece, just to protect the woodwork beyond.
    It won't look as bad as it sounds - if I can have just one long edge looking reasonable then thats fine.
    Have a good evening, all.
    John :)
     
  7. Richard C

    Richard C

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    Just to quantify; Gypsum is only good for around 49 degrees C & although it's used in in the construction of fire boards, expose it to anything much higher on a regular basis & it disintegrates; probably won't matter in your case though ;)
     
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  9. ^woody^

    ^woody^

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    But surely, a Gypsum board tends to go by it's other name of "plasterboard", and is not a fire-resistant board in this context
     
  10. RF Lighting

    RF Lighting

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    Pink plasterboard is fire resistant.
     
  11. ^woody^

    ^woody^

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    White and grey (well any) plasterboard is fire resistant, but plasterboard is not a fire resistant board in this context
     
  12. Richard C

    Richard C

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    Woods I’m not entirely sure what context you’re on about but my guess is your being pedantic as usual.

    Plasterboard is gypsum based & being “of limited combustibility” is fire resistant to a degree. Gypsum is also used in the construction of what is determined as “fire performance plasterboard” which presumably makes it even more limited to combustion are even more fire resistant; but gypsum based boards will disintegrate after a one off fire exposure or even regular exposure to more than 40 degrees, it’s in the specs!

    Masterboard is a silicate based board & one I know to be suitable for high heat applications & as a firebord. Not sure about Hardibacker, I know it to be a good cement based backer board which I use in tiling but have not looked at the spec regarding fire resistance.

    All I’m doing is to help by pointing out the limitations of Gypsum based boards to the OP, I think he's got the message as far as his application goes. I didn’t give them their name & am not up for up for endless hours of debate about definitions.
     
  13. Burnerman

    Burnerman

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    Thanks again gents - the material I need must have one long edge that can be smoothed / maybe painted. I guess Supalux is the one to go for as the paper edges of any gypsum board wouldn't work here.
    Just got to track some down - can't say I've noticed it in my usual sheds trek.
    John :)
     
  14. DIYnot Local

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