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Fixing 6' gate to concrete wall

Discussion in 'In the Garden' started by Cory H, 20 Oct 2021.

  1. Cory H

    Cory H

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    Hi all,
    I'm looking to fix an outward opening gate to the inside face of a pillar (built from concrete blocks). I'm thinking of using 24"/30" hook and band hinges.

    Can these hook plates be fixed into concrete block? I see most people fix them into timber gate posts but I want to avoid that to preserve the full width that's already there.

    Does fixing the hook plate into masonry work using a wedge/sleeve anchor or why does everyone seem to fix them into timber?

    Thanks
     
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  3. Swwils

    Swwils

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    Use a chemcial anchor and build hinge pins into block.
     
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  4. Mr Chibs

    Mr Chibs

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    Is it 6’ wide, as well as tall?
     
  5. foxhole

    foxhole

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    Proximity of the holes on the hook plate can mean fixing into blocks is more difficult as holes are fairly close together.
     
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  6. JohnD

    JohnD

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    I'd certainly recommend a wooden gatepost. If you don't want a square one you can bolt a piece of 4x2 or something into the bricks.

    And yes, use galvanised lift-off hinges, not butts or Tees

    If you have no lintel (it will support the post on the other side) you can put the top hinge upside down to prevent people lifting the gate off.

    What will prevent your pillar from falling over?
     
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  8. Cory H

    Cory H

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    @Swwils Thanks, I'll fix using a chemical anchor
    @Mr Chibs Yeah, it's 6' wide and around 7' tall
    @foxhole Yeah, I've been thinking about the narrow spacing in the supplied plates. I might get some of the 19mm hook plates visible in the attached image
    @JohnD Thanks for the tips. The pillars are 550mmx550mm (as seen in the attached image). Is it a possibility that the weight of a swinging gate could destabilise these? I'm just curious why you recommend the gatepost? Is the main benefit ease/speed of installation or is there something else I'm missing?
    Thanks all 19mmPinPlate.jpg gatePillar.jpg
     
  9. JohnD

    JohnD

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    I think the pillars are piers attached to a wall, so the wall will stop them falling over. A blockwork pillar on its own would not support a gate for long.

    I am sure that hinges screwed into a wooden post will stay tight longer as they have some resilience. Screws or bolts into brick or block are liable to shake loose. The post will damp the shock. you can also use a bolt or studding through brickwork, though that might not be possible in your case. A nut and washer will not shake loose.

    With a hook and band, you can put two or more large greased stainless washers on the pin before lifting the gate on, they will give a flat smooth surface, resisting wear, grating, and squeaking. They will align themselves to run flat. This will also protect the galvanising from being rubbed off.
     
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  10. big-all

    big-all

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    the trouble as i see it is with conrete blocks you have the whole weight off the gate hanging on one block so iff it not tied in and the bond is a bit poor it may work loose or give way
    if you have a post it will bind together a bit and spread the load also a gate will be perhaps 30mm wide if you including catches take up perhaps 45-60mm plus so a 2x3 posts with hinge on the face or side will take up no more space but will give a stronger hinge supported over a greater area
    are you talking metal or wooden gate ??
     
    Last edited: 23 Oct 2021
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  11. RayCaister

    RayCaister

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    Gates (70kg each) hinged on 4x4 bolted to brick piers without narrowing gap. ... upload_2021-10-23_9-23-31.jpeg
     
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  12. Cory H

    Cory H

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    Ok, so using a gate post gives a better fixing for screws and distributes the load across multiple blocks and joints. That all makes sense now
    @JohnD Thanks for the advice on the greased washer
    @big-all It'll be a wooden gate - 75mm thick like @RayCaister 's directly above but roughly 6' wide and 7' high. I'm doubting a 3x2 or 4x2 post with 2" screws would support the load? - so a 3x3 post would be required thereby reducing the opening width. The post would be on the inside face of the pier ((where the existing gate is fixed) as I want the gate to open outwards and I can't mount the post on the outside face of the pier)
    My current thought is to chance fixing the gate with 3 large hinges using chemical anchors into the blockwork and hope the mortar joints survive.
    If there's any movement, I'll lift the gate and go with the post option.
    I'd be happy to go with a 4x2 post if it would work but not really willing to go to 3x3? Any final thoughts? Thanks for all the advice
     
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