Fluorescent ballast bypass for Philips LED tubes - Query

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One of our old 58W tubes in the kitchen has died so good time to go to LED

im wanting to remove the ballasts and connect direct to mains, its only a single tube light with a Kengo MB58 Ballast

1656338746157.png


Ive ordered this tube: https://www.lighting.philips.co.uk/...epro-ledtube-em-mains/929003022502_EU/product

Which I believe is single sided so I have to rewire to one side only? (from the videos and posts ive read anyway)

But on the install diagram it shows when removing the ballast its wired in on both sides

so which one shall I do?

1656338578275.png


There was another post on here (https://www.diynot.com/diy/threads/how-to-remove-ballast-from-led-tube-fitting.469390/) which has a similar setup as mine, and the person just connected the cables going into the ballast together?

Should I be checkign for shunted and non shunted tomb stones as well?
 
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Having recently replaced one myself, I believe that they are single ended, but the second end has a short between the two pins.
This also allows the lamp to work in an un-modified lamp holder (with only the starter swapped).
In your case, removing starter and ballast, you can connect the wires that are most convenient *
I hope that makes sense! :)

Edit:
It is best to follow the manufacturers wiring diagram:
Screenshot_20220627-232856_Chrome.jpg

This will allow the tube to operate correctly no matter which way around the tube is inserted. It is possible to wire Live and Neutral directly to one end only, but the tube must always be inserted the correct way. Incorrect insertion may cause damage to the tube!
 
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Having recently replaced one myself, I believe that they are single ended, but the second end has a short between the two pins.
This also allows the lamp to work in an un-modified lamp holder (with only the starter swapped).
In your case, removing starter and ballast, you can connect the wires that are most convenient.
I hope that makes sense! :)
Thanks! sounds good. Awaiting for the tube to arrive now :)
 
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I found it far easier to take the whole batten down and gut the fitting, rather than messing around with it on the ceiling.
Any issues when the tube arrives - let us know and include some pics! Good luck :)
 
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...out of curiosity, I have just checked!
The pins on the non-powered end have a resistance of about 10 Ohms, so definitely not a dead short - presumably it includes some form of protection against damage if the tube is plugged in the wrong way round?
 
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...out of curiosity, I have just checked!
The pins on the non-powered end have a resistance of about 10 Ohms, so definitely not a dead short - presumably it includes some form of protection against damage if the tube is plugged in the wrong way round?
More to the point, it allows the tube to work if fitted either way round.

Edited to make sense.
 
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Basic is you short out ballast so it does nothing and fit supplied fuse instead of starter. Basic both ends in series, so does not matter which way around tube goes.
 
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More to the point, it allows the tube to work if fitted either wrong way round.

Edited to make sense.
I apologise, I have realised my oversight and edited my original post.
Due to the dead short over the pins on the non-powered side of 'safe' tubes - @2:27:
If the batten has been modified to have L and N on one side, the tube will only work if it is inserted the correct way round (and may be damaged/blow a fuse if inserted incorrectly)
If the wiring follows that recommended by the manufacturer:
Screenshot_20220627-232856_Chrome.jpg
The tube will work correctly whichever way it is inserted.

Although, again, as I measured 10 Ohms resistance on the non-powered pins (rather than a dead short), I still guess there may be some protection built in - I will have to get destructive sometime soon! :)
 
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I apologise, I have realised my oversight and edited my original post.
With this sort of thing unless you are familiar with the device and the way they're used, I don't think it's an oversight, just lack of experience.
I've handled loads of LED tubes but only dealt with the wiring once. I didn't quite understand the instructions on wiring as the tube was clearly marked which end required power.
Truthfully I only know about the shorted pins from posts on forums.
 
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2200 lumens is a lot less than the output of the fluorescent tube you are replacing. Don’t rip the ballast out yet. When you find how dim the LED tube is you may want to put a florescent back.
 
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....ahhh... And hence my original recommendation!
The instructions for my tube say it is ok to connect the power end only (just saying 'Warning! No Power Input' on the other!)
Screenshot_20220628-061807_Adobe Acrobat.jpg
BTW, this is for a '4000lm' tube from TLC, that I find to be more than bright enough! :)
 
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2200 lumens is a lot less than the output of the fluorescent tube you are replacing. Don’t rip the ballast out yet. When you find how dim the LED tube is you may want to put a florescent back.
As I've often said, whenever I have replaced fluorescent tubes with LED ones of the same length (hence around half the "lumens", I have always found that, at least perception-wise, the illumination is at least as good ('bright') as with the fluorescent. This may in part be due to the fact that the light radiation from an LED tube is far more directional.
 
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I tried replacing one a while back and the first thing my wife said “ Why so dim.”
 
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2200 lumens is a lot less than the output of the fluorescent tube you are replacing. Don’t rip the ballast out yet. When you find how dim the LED tube is you may want to put a florescent back.
We should look at lux levels, not lumens.
Yes LED tubes often don't produce as many lumens as a traditional tube, but the lux on the ground may well be the same or similar. A modern 5ft ~20w led tube will nearly always be more than bright enough to replace a 5ft 58w traditional tube
 

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