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Gas hob and elec oven electrics

Discussion in 'Electrics UK' started by billal, 29 Mar 2021.

  1. billal

    billal

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    Hi,

    I've just had a electric hob replaced by a gas hob. The electric hob had its own circuit but is now switched off from the fuse box. I just had a couple of questions.

    1. the gas hob came with a plug for the ignition, the gas engineer just plugged it into a socket inside the cupboard. Does the electric regs require a switch to be above the worktop (in easy access) for a gas hob? or only required for elec hob.

    2.my electric oven wiring is also going into the cupboard and there is no switch above the worktop to switch if on/off. I was wondering, could I wire my oven into the wiring which was being used for the elec hob? that way there will be a switch above the worktop to switch it on/off in an emergency or is that not required by regulations for elec ovens?

    Thanks,
     
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  3. Astra99

    Astra99

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    Assuming your electric oven is 3KW or less, (so it can be plugged into a 13A socket) you could put a double socket on the end of the cable which went to the old electric hob, and plug both the new electric oven and the gas hob ignition into that double socket.

    If the new electric oven is more than 3KW, then an IEC 60309 socket could be fitted to the end of the old cooker cable and the equivalent plug on the new oven. This would leave the hob ignition on the socket in the cupboard, which is perfectly all right as it can be isolated by removing the plug.

    The IEC 60309 socket is rated at either 16A (3.7KW) or 32A (7.3KW) and the size appropriate to the new oven loading should be used.
     
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  4. billal

    billal

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    Thanks and good idea of adding a double socket, I may do that as that circuit will be dedicated for the oven and gas hob.

    Now, my next question.. the switch + socket which was previously used for the elec hob is now within 300mm of my gas hob (as my gas hob is a lot bigger)... I will move the switch further away when i come to retile my kitchen, if the cable is not long enough and needs extending, whats the best way to extend the cable? I wasnt sure if I could use a junction box as I will be needing to bury it inside the wall.
     
  5. winston1

    winston1

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    The regs do not require an isolator at all. So they cannot say where something that is not required can go.
     
  6. winston1

    winston1

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    I think the best way is to solder on a new piece and cover the joint with self amalgamating tape. Others may have different preferences.
     
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  7. Taylortwocities

    Taylortwocities

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    There are several methods. But if the joint will be buried in the wall you cannot use screw terminals. The junction will need to be of a maintenance free type. There are several types of these, or other approved methods like crimping or soldering.
    Note: if the cable comes vertically down the wall, you cannot then extend the cable horizontally snd cover the joint over. This will create a “dog leg” and the cable will not turn be in the recognised permitted zone.
     
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  8. billal

    billal

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    Would these 6mm butt connectors from toolstation be okay to crimp the cables?
    https://www.toolstation.com/butt-connector/p85191
     
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  10. Taylortwocities

    Taylortwocities

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    Last edited: 29 Mar 2021
  11. billal

    billal

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    I could borrow the crimping tool from the electricians at work :)
    Is it necessary to cover the joints, could I just use amalgamating tape?
     
  12. Taylortwocities

    Taylortwocities

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    The conductors , including the joint, must be insulated and sheathed.
    I prefer to use heat shrink sleeving. Self-amalgamating tape is another option. do not use that adhesive plastic tape. It stops being sticky after a while.


    So, that’s the joint sorted. Can we take another look at the route that the extended cable might be taking?
     
  13. billal

    billal

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    So moving the switch socket horizontally to the left next to the other socket on the wall, this will ensure its more than 300mm away from the edge of the hob.

    Will be retiling the walls so will bury the extended cable behind the plaster board.
    upload_2021-3-30_19-27-9.png
     
  14. Taylortwocities

    Taylortwocities

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    I see. But you probably cannot do that. The existing cable that feeds the switch/socket will probably be routed vertically down the wall.
    you can check this by looking inside the box.
    If you join another piece of cable and route this horizontally, and tile over the joint, there will no longer be anything on the wall to indicate the presence of the vertical cable in the wall. This is not permitted.

    Look where the cable comes from and advise.
     
  15. billal

    billal

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    From taking the cover off, it looks like the wire is coming from the ceiling, but I was convinced it was coming from the back wall as I can see the cable running across my utility room and garage to the consumer unit.

    I think I will just get an electrician to disconnect the wire from the fuse box and I'll rip the wire out when I come to retile the kitchen as its no longer required.
     
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